First announced in June 1988 in Beep!, a Japanese gaming magazine, the developing console was referred to as the "Mark V", but Sega management felt the need for a stronger name. After reviewing more than 300 proposals, the company settled on "Mega Drive". In North America, the name of the console was changed to "Genesis". The reason for this change is not known, but it may have been due to a trademark dispute.[19]
PS4 controller is the first one to introduce a light function. This function can show different colours that serve different purposes, depending on the game you play. For example, they can notify the player about critical messages like not having a lot of life left in the game. These lights also ensure that the position of the controller in relation to the console is read even more precisely than before.

To compete with Nintendo, Sega was more open to new types of games than its rival, but still tightly controlled the approval process for third-party games and charged high prices for cartridge manufacturing.[43] Technicians from American third-party video game publisher Electronic Arts (EA) reverse engineered the Genesis in 1989,[44] following nearly one year of negotiations with Sega in which EA requested a more liberal licensing agreement than was standard in the industry before releasing its games for the system.[45] The clean room reverse engineering was led by Steve Hayes and Jim Nitchals, lasting several months before EA secretly began game development.[45] EA founder Trip Hawkins confronted Nakayama with this information one day prior to the 1990 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), noting that EA had the ability to run its own licensing program if Sega refused to meet its demands. Sega relented, and the next day EA's upcoming Genesis games were showcased at CES.[45] EA signed what Hawkins described as "a very unusual and much more enlightened license agreement" with Sega in June 1990: "Among other things, we had the right to make as many titles as we wanted. We could approve our own titles ... the royalty rates were a lot more reasonable. We also had more direct control over manufacturing."[44] After the deal was in place, EA chief creative officer Bing Gordon learned that "we hadn't figured out all the workarounds" and "Sega still had the ability to lock us out," noting "It just would have been a public relations fiasco."[45] EA released its first two Genesis games, Populous and Budokan: The Martial Spirit, within the month.[44] The first Genesis version of EA's John Madden Football arrived before the end of 1990,[44] and became what Gordon called a "killer app" for the system.[45] Taking advantage of the licensing agreement, Gordon and EA's vice president of marketing services Nancy Fong created a visual identifier for EA's Genesis cartridges: A yellow stripe on their left side added during manufacturing.[45]
PS4 controller is the first one to introduce a light function. This function can show different colours that serve different purposes, depending on the game you play. For example, they can notify the player about critical messages like not having a lot of life left in the game. These lights also ensure that the position of the controller in relation to the console is read even more precisely than before.
,Okay, I got this because I remember playing the Sonic the Hedgehog games when I was a kid. The feel of this in your hand is light, i.e. cheap, however, it has the games and they have worked for me. There are some people who said the sound was way off, but I haven't noticed any problems. Also, this will play Sega cartridges if you still have them/buy them and that's a nice plus.
By 1991, compact discs had gained in popularity as a data storage device for music and software. PCs and video game companies had started to make use of this technology. NEC had been the first to include CD technology in a game console with the release of the TurboGrafx-CD add-on, and Nintendo was making plans to develop its own CD peripheral as well. Seeing the opportunity to gain an advantage over its rivals, Sega partnered with JVC to develop a CD-ROM add-on for the Genesis.[3][129][130] Sega launched the Mega-CD in Japan[3] on December 1, 1991, initially retailing at JP¥49,800.[131] The CD add-on was launched in North America on October 15, 1992, as the Sega CD, with a retail price of US$299;[3] it was released in Europe as the Mega-CD in 1993.[131] In addition to greatly expanding the potential size of its games, this add-on unit upgraded the graphics and sound capabilities by adding a second, more powerful processor, more system memory, and hardware-based scaling and rotation similar to that found in Sega's arcade games.[3][132] It provided battery-backed storage RAM to allow games to save high scores, configuration data, and game progress.[129]
Right, this is complicated. A Nintendo Switch costs around £280; an Xbox One S is around £200, an Xbox One X is £450; A PlayStation 4 is £250 and a PlayStation 4 Pro is £350. Those prices are for basic hardware packages. Spend a little more to pick up a bundle deal, which includes the console plus a game and possibly an extra controller, for roughly £50. With Black Friday approaching, it’s a good idea to see what deals retailers like Game, HMV, Argos, Amazon and supermarkets are offering.
You can keep it in its dock to enjoy gaming in TV mode, remove it from its dock to play it in handheld mode or flip out its kickstand and set it on a table. The Switch’s battery life is decent but not outstanding and can last for anywhere from 2.5 to 6.5 hours depending on how intense the game is. The Switch’s controllers – called Joy-Cons – are equally versatile. Each one can slide onto a side of the tablet, creating a comfortable and immersive handheld experience. Or you and a friend can each use a Joy-Con for multiplayer fun. The Switch also comes with a controller frame that you can slide the Joy-Cons onto, or you can buy the Pro controller for a more traditional experience. With the Switch, Nintendo continues its tradition of making gaming devices with simple, intuitive interfaces and family-friendly game titles. You’ll have access to exclusive game franchises like Mario, Xenoblade Chronicles and Zelda. Additionally, Nintendo has now opened the door for third-party indie developers to create games for the Switch, so you’ll have access to additional titles – and even cross-platform titles like Splatoon 2, Disgaea 5, Rayman Legends, Minecraft, Stardew Valley and Skyrim.
It starts with a black screen. A woman’s voice. She speaks Japanese, and your eyes are wired to the subtitles. You have waited many months – if not years – for this game. Finally, you are sitting here. With sweaty hands and light in your eyes. The rest of the world disappeared around you, when you inserted the game disk into your console. Now it is only you, your controller and a long game. The graphics come up on the screen, the familiar melody starts to play, and your head explodes in a wild euphoria. FINALLY!
Working with Sega Enterprises, JVC released the Wondermega on April 1, 1992, in Japan. The system was later redesigned by JVC and released as the X'Eye in North America in September 1994. Designed by JVC to be a Genesis and Sega CD combination with high quality audio, the Wondermega's high price ($500 at launch[147]) kept it out of the hands of average consumers.[148] The same was true of the Pioneer LaserActive, which requires an add-on known as the Mega-LD pack, developed by Sega, in order to play Genesis and Sega CD games. Although the LaserActive was lined up to compete with the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, the combined price of the system and the Mega-LD pack made it a prohibitively expensive option for Sega players.[149] Aiwa released the CSD-GM1, a combination Genesis/Sega CD unit built into a boombox. Several companies added the Mega Drive to personal computers, mimicking the design of Sega's TeraDrive; these include the MSX models AX-330 and AX-990, distributed in Kuwait and Yemen, and the Amstrad Mega PC, distributed in Europe and Australia.[19]
Although Katz and Sega of America's marketing experts disliked the idea of Sonic, certain that it would not catch on with most American kids,[18][69] Kalinske's strategy to place Sonic the Hedgehog as the pack-in game paid off.[2][70] Featuring speedy gameplay, Sonic the Hedgehog greatly increased the popularity of the Sega Genesis in North America.[50] Bundling Sonic the Hedgehog with the Sega Genesis is credited with helping Sega gain 65% of the market share against Nintendo.[1]
After the abortive 32X, Sega entered the fifth generation with the Saturn. Sega released several highly regarded titles for the Saturn, but a series of bad decisions alienated many developers and retailers. While the Saturn was technologically advanced, it was also complex, difficult, and unintuitive to write games for. In particular, programming 3D graphics that could compete with those on Nintendo and Sony's consoles proved exceptionally difficult for third-party developers. Because the Saturn used quadrilaterals, rather than triangles, as its basic polygon, cross platform games had to be completely rewritten to see a Saturn port. The Saturn was also a victim of internal politics at Sega. While the Saturn sold comparably well in Japan, Sega's branches in North America and Europe refused to license localizations of many popular Japanese titles, holding they were ill-suited to Western markets. First-party hits like Sakura Taisen never saw Western releases, while several third-party titles released on both PlayStation and Saturn in Japan, like Grandia and Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, were released in North America and Europe as PlayStation exclusives.
eBay offers a wide range of games for all systems. Best-selling new releases like Batman: Return to Arkham or LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens, as well as classic old-school RPG video games like Baldur's Gate or The Elder Scrolls series are affordably priced on eBay. As technology moves at a rapid pace, many consoles get discontinued and become impossible to buy at regular stores. Here's where eBay comes in. Here can find an ongoing auction for any kind of game console you can think of. Looking for a video game from your childhood? It's yours again with a few clicks! With eBay, there's no such thing as obsolete software because you can always buy the obsolete hardware to go with it!

First graphic computer games in history were developed by the American computer scientist Alexander Douglas, who in 1952 created tic-tac-toe for a so-called EDSAC computer. The game never spread, because the computer was made exclusively for Cambridge University. The first computer game that could be played by several people at the same time was “Spacewar!” from 1962. The game was developed by the American programmer Steve Russell. It could be played by two people with joysticks, who could shoot down each other’s spaceships with missiles.


“The SEGA Mega Drive was my first console that I remember un-boxing then playing on for as long as I can remember – these consoles have brought those memories flooding back to me! They’re packed with the majority of my favourite games and the handheld has an SD card slot which is great for expanding your collection for those that are missing. The home console comes with 2 controllers (that’s right, you won’t be charged extra to play 2 player!) which is great for replaying all those classic multi-player games with a friend. The home console also has an original cartridge slot, so you can dust off all your old SEGA Mega Drive cartridges (or pick some up for cheap on eBay) and replay them in all their 16-bit glory!”
Microsoft's Xbox was the first dedicated video game console released by the company in North America on November 15, 2001, in Japan on February 22, 2002, and in Europe and Australia on March 14, 2002. Microsoft realized the power of video game consoles and feared with growing capabilities they may take over more than the living room. It was the first console to employ a hard drive right out of the box to save games, the first to include an Ethernet port for broadband internet, and the beginning of Microsoft's online Xbox LIVE service. Microsoft was able to attract many PC developers by using the NT kernel and DirectX from their Windows operating system. Though criticized for its bulky size and the awkwardness of its original controller, the Xbox eventually gained popularity, especially in the US, where it outsold the GameCube to secure second place, due in part to the success of the Halo franchise.
^ Sheffield, Brandon (December 4, 2009). "Out of the Blue: Naoto Ohshima Speaks". Gamasutra. UBM plc. Archived from the original on July 16, 2015. Retrieved February 15, 2012. The original Nights was chiefly made with the Japanese and European audiences in mind -- Sonic, meanwhile, was squarely aimed at the U.S. market ... [Sonic is] a character that I think is suited to America -- or, at least, the image I had of America at the time. ... Well, he's blue because that's Sega's more-or-less official company color. His shoes were inspired by the cover to Michael Jackson's Bad, which contrasted heavily between white and red -- that Santa Claus-type color. I also thought that red went well for a character who can run really fast, when his legs are spinning.

The Nomad was released in October 1995 in North America only.[34][35] The release was five years into the market span of the Genesis, with an existing library of more than 500 Genesis games. According to former Sega of America research and development head Joe Miller, the Nomad was not intended to be the Game Gear's replacement and believes that there was little planning from Sega of Japan for the new handheld.[36] Sega was supporting five different consoles: Saturn, Genesis, Game Gear, Pico, and the Master System, as well as the Sega CD and 32X add-ons. In Japan, the Mega Drive had never been successful and the Saturn was more successful than Sony's PlayStation, so Sega Enterprises CEO Hayao Nakayama decided to focus on the Saturn.[37] By 1999, the Nomad was being sold at less than a third of its original price.[38]

Many of the Sony Mega Drives available come boxed with your old favourites, such as Sonic the Hedgehog, Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter, Ecco the Dolphin and Joe Montana Football. Some consoles even have games built in, with up to 80 games included in the console. If you have a favourite classic game, look out for boxed sets featuring the character or graphics from the game.
And now, finally, we’re left with the actual Sega Genesis games, of which there is a whopping 45. That’s 100 percent more than the SNES Classic’s 21 games, so why include the garbage to inflate the back-of-the-box boasting? Scan this list and be assured that, for all of its myriad flaws, the Genesis Flashback is just chock full of classic Genesis games.
We’ve tested gaming consoles rigorously for over four years. Our most recent evaluations took over 80 hours. Our writer and product tester is a lifetime avid gamer who thoroughly researched and tested each of the consoles, pushing each to their limit to test their quality, features, performance and ease of use. We considered each console’s interface, gaming and video playback, exclusives, price features and overall ease of use, all while examining how effective each console would be for users of all gaming experience levels and budgets.
In 1990, Nintendo finally brought their Super Famicom to market and brought it to the United States as the Super NES (SNES) a year later. Its release marginalized the TurboGrafx and the Neo Geo, but came late enough for Sega to sell several million consoles in North America and gain a strong foothold. The same year the SNES was released Sega released Sonic the Hedgehog, which spiked Genesis sales, similar to Space Invaders on the Atari. Also, by 1992 the first fully licensed NFL Football game was released: NFL Sports Talk Football '93, which was available only on the Genesis. This impact on Genesis sales and the overall interest of realistic sports games would start the trend of licensed sports games being viewed as necessary for the success of a console in the US. While Nintendo enjoyed dominance in Japan and Sega in Europe, the competition between the two was particularly fierce and close in North America. Ultimately, the SNES outsold the Genesis, but only after Sega discontinued the Genesis to focus on the next generation of consoles.
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