Whether you're looking for PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch consoles and games or you're a PC gamer, the Amazon.co.uk Video Games store has everything you need, all at everyday low prices. From the current-generations to the classic Xbox 360, PS3 and Nintendo Wii, handheld gaming with Nintendo 3DS and PS Vita and even PSP we have a huge selection for you.
This brand new SEGA Mega Drive / SEGA Genesis Classic Retro Gaming Wireless Console (25th Sonic the Hedgehog Anniversary Edition) is a perfect and compact retro games console video game player. Loaded with a whopping 80 SEGA and SEGA Mega Drive games including hits as Sonic the Hedgehog (1 and 2) and Mortal Kombat (1, 2 and 3), this retro games wireless console is an incredible device and the perfect gift for kids and adults.
Home computers have long used magnetic storage devices. Both tape drives and floppy disk drives were common on early microcomputers. Their popularity is in large part because a tape drive or disk drive can write to any material it can read. However, magnetic media is volatile and can be more easily damaged than game cartridges or optical discs.[88] Among the first consoles to use magnetic media were the Bally Astrocade and APF-M1000, both of which could use cassette tapes through expansions. In Bally's case, this allowed the console to see new game development even after Bally dropped support for it. While magnetic media remained limited in use as a primary form of distribution, three popular subsequent consoles also had expansions available to allow them to use this format. The Starpath Supercharger can load Atari 2600 games from audio cassettes; Starpath used it to cheaply distribute their own games from 1982 to 1984 and today it is used by many programmers to test, distribute, and play homebrew software. The Disk System, a floppy disk-reading add-on to the Famicom (as the NES was known in Japan), was released by Nintendo in 1986 for the Japanese market. Nintendo sold the disks cheaply and sold vending machines where customers could have new games written to their disks up to 500 times.[89] In 1999, Nintendo released another Japan-only floppy disk add-on, the Nintendo 64DD, for the Nintendo 64.
According to a recent report completed by the Entertainment Software Association in 2018, 64 percent of U.S. households own at least one gaming device, and 60 percent of Americans play video games daily. And though gamers are predominantly male, gamers of all ages and genders are present in the study. The report also shows that consumers spent $36 billion on the gaming industry in 2017, predominantly on content.
Nintendo's NES Classic isn't just a convenient way to play beloved NES games: it's an easy-to use console that looks the part and plays games the way you remember with a few new quality-of-life features. Marketing and distribution woes aside, it's the best example of a multi-game classic console to date, precisely because it does what you expect without major caveats.

Microsoft's Xbox was the first dedicated video game console released by the company in North America on November 15, 2001, in Japan on February 22, 2002, and in Europe and Australia on March 14, 2002. Microsoft realized the power of video game consoles and feared with growing capabilities they may take over more than the living room. It was the first console to employ a hard drive right out of the box to save games, the first to include an Ethernet port for broadband internet, and the beginning of Microsoft's online Xbox LIVE service. Microsoft was able to attract many PC developers by using the NT kernel and DirectX from their Windows operating system. Though criticized for its bulky size and the awkwardness of its original controller, the Xbox eventually gained popularity, especially in the US, where it outsold the GameCube to secure second place, due in part to the success of the Halo franchise.


The SEGA Mega Drive (or SEGA Genesis in the USA!) was the best home video games consoles of its time and - 30 years on - still graces Top 10 lists to this day. The reason: a stunning collection of games which pushed the 16-bit platform to its limit. Sonic the Hedgehog brought zip and audacity to the side-scrolling platformer, while Mortal Kombat finally found a home console that could match its prestige. 


The Xbox One and PS4 also offer access to old games, but in different ways. The Xbox One will let you put your old Xbox 360 games into the drive and play them (although only a selection of games are compatible). You can also play dozens of classic Xbox titles by buying a Game Pass subscription. The PS4 does not play old PS3 discs, but it offers a subscription service, called PlayStation Now, which lets you stream and play a huge selection of favourite PlayStation titles from yesteryear.
*”$15 Starts any new agreement” or “$15 pays your first week” offer is valid only on new agreements entered into 1/27/19-2/23/19. Customers eligible for this offer will pay $15 for the initial rental period until first renewal, up to seven days. Offer does not include tax and fees and charges you may incur. Customer must pay processing fee of $25 in California & New York and $10 in Hawaii. After the first week, regular rental rates will apply. Regular rate, term and total cost vary by item selected. Offers will not reduce the total amount necessary to acquire ownership or purchase-option amounts. Cannot be combined with any other promotion. Participating locations only. See Store Manager for complete details.

PlayStation 4 Pro is the newest addition to the product range and is an amazing and powerful game console: when you turn the camera over the landscapes, when the explosions are blasting in your ears and when the speed is up on the seventh gear, you feel it. PlayStation 4 Pro is a sharper game experience, the colours catch your eye, and thanks to the higher resolution, GPU-power and more frames per second you get a gaming experience that reminds of that of high-end gaming computers. PlayStation 4 Pro is for you, who goes all in. For you, who plays on console but has missed the depth and GPU-power that you get when gaming on a PC.


But the Genesis Flashback also wisely includes the standard DB9 port that the original Genesis had, meaning your old (or eBay-acquired!) controllers will work just fine on the Flashback, a major improvement from the SNES Classic’s bizarre choice to use a Wiimote expansion port. The negative on that one? AtGames throws in not bad, but not excellent, wireless controllers instead of taking the opportunity to offer excellent wired controllers. Another negative: You will have to use the six-button Genesis controller, even though many of the included games don’t require it. No three-button pads allowed.
Amazing buy! Just like what I remimber as a kid. The 81 games Included are: •Adventure in the Park •Air Hockey •Alex Kid in the Enchanted Castle •Alien Storm •Altered Beast •Arrow Flash •Black Sheep •Bomber •Bonanza Bros. •Bottle Taps Race •Brain Switch •Break the Fireline •Bubbles Master •Cannon •Checkers •Chess •Columns •Columns III •Comix Zone •Crack Down •Cross the road •Curling 2010 •Decap Attack •Dinosaur Puzzle •Dominant Amber •Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine •ESWAT: City Under Siege •Eternal Champions •Fatal Labyrinth •Fight or Lose •Flash Memory •Flicky •Gain Ground •Golden Axe •Golden Axe II •Golden Axe III •Hexagonos •Hidden Agenda •Hide and Seek •Jack's Pea •Jewel Magic •Jewel Master •Jura Formula •Kid Chameleon •Lost World Sudoku •Mahjong Solitaire •Mega Brain Switch •Memory •Mirror Mirror •Mortal Kombat •Mortal Kombat II •Mortal Kombat III •Mr. Balls •Mya Master Mind •Naval Power •Panic Lift •Phantasy Star II •Phantasy Star III •Phantasy Star IV •Plumbing Contest •Ptero Spotting •Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi •Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention •Shining Force II: The Ancient Seal •Shining in the Darkness •Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master •Skeleton Scale •Snake •Sonic

While it's true that AtGames' Sega Genesis Flashback is a tempting product in light of Nintendo's recent efforts, it is nothing like the NES Classic. Nevermind that it's filled with classic Genesis games--many of which you can buy today on Steam, PSN, or Xbox Live. It's a misleading and faulty product that is marketed to trick you, to play off of your love of classic Sega games and your residual admiration of the NES Classic. The legacy of Sega Genesis deserves far better than this opportunistic cash-in.


Sony's PlayStation 3 was released in Japan on November 11, 2006, in North America on November 17, 2006, and in Europe and Australia on March 23, 2007. All PlayStation 3's come with a hard drive and are able to play Blu-ray Disc games and Blu-ray Disc movies out of the box. The PlayStation 3 was the first video game console to support HDMI output out of the box, using full 1080p resolution. Up to seven controllers can connect to the console using Bluetooth. There are 6 discontinued versions of the PS3: a 20 GB HDD version (discontinued in North America and Japan, and was never released in PAL territories), a 40 GB HDD version (discontinued), a 60 GB HDD version (discontinued in North America, Japan and PAL territories), 80 GB HDD version (only in some NTSC territories and PAL territories), a "slim" 120GB HDD version (discontinued), and a "slim" 250 GB version (discontinued). The two current shipping versions of the PlayStation 3 are: a "slim" 160 GB HDD version and a "slim" 320 GB HDD version. The hard drive can be replaced with any standard 2.5" Serial ATA drive and the system has support for removable media storage, such as Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick PRO Duo, USB, SD, MiniSD, and CompactFlash (CF) digital media, but only the PlayStation versions up to 80 GB support this. The slim PlayStation 3 consoles (120 GB and up) had removable storage discontinued.[50] All models are backward compatible with the original PlayStation's software library, and the launch models, since discontinued, are also backward compatible with PlayStation 2 games. As a cost-cutting measure, later models removed the Emotion Engine, making them incompatible with PlayStation 2 discs. In 2010, Sony released PlayStation Move, allowing for motion-controlled games. With recent software updates, the PlayStation 3 can play 3D Blu-ray movies and 3D games.
The VES continued to be sold at a profit after 1977, and both Bally (with their Home Library Computer in 1977) and Magnavox (with the Odyssey² in 1978) brought their own programmable cartridge-based consoles to the market. However, it was not until Atari released a conversion of the golden age arcade hit Space Invaders in 1980 for the Atari 2600 that the home console industry took off. Many consumers bought an Atari console so they could play Space Invaders at home. The unprecedented success of Space Invaders started the trend of console manufacturers trying to get exclusive rights to arcade titles, and the trend of advertisements for game consoles claiming to bring the arcade experience home. Throughout the early 1980s, other companies released video game consoles of their own. Many of the video game systems (e.g. ColecoVision) were technically superior to the Atari 2600, and marketed as improvements over the Atari 2600. However, Atari dominated the console market in the early 1980s.
×