Is the console primarily for young children, teenagers or adults? Or do you want something everyone can play together? If it’s the latter, the Switch is a great family option: most of Nintendo’s own games are suitable for children, they’re intuitive (which makes them great for parties where some participants aren’t gamers), but they’re also challenging enough to appeal to experienced players. However, teenagers and adults are more likely to want to play the sort of action adventure and shooter games (such as Assassin’s Creed, Tomb Raider and Red Dead Redemption) that don’t come to Switch. A PS4 or Xbox One may be better if you have a mature household.

To check, I played a handful of titles on my original Genesis, running through a Framemeister XRGB Mini upscaler into an HDTV. This solution also introduces a small amount of input latency, which I’ve always found negligible. While playing Sonic the Hedgehog on the Flashback may feel mushy compared to an actual Genesis — thanks to a combination of dropped frames and laggy wireless controller — many other Genesis classics feel great, like the Phantasy Star games. But if your product is a recreation of the Sega Genesis, I’d suggest accurate Sonic emulation is like ... the most basic of expectations. Considering stable Genesis emulators have existed for literally 20 years, this failure above all others is the most damning.


NEC brought the first fourth-generation console to market with their PC Engine (or TurboGrafx16) when Hudson Soft approached them with an advanced graphics chip. Hudson had previously approached Nintendo, only to be rebuffed by a company still raking in the profits of the NES. The TurboGrafx used the unusual HuCard format to store games. The small size of these proprietary cards allowed NEC to re-release the console as a handheld game console. The PC Engine enjoyed brisk sales in Japan, but its North American counterpart, the TurboGrafx, lagged behind the competition. The console never saw an official release in Europe, but clones and North American imports were available in some markets starting in 1990. NEC advertised their console as "16-bit" to highlight its advances over the NES. This started the trend of all subsequent fourth generations consoles being advertised as 16 bit. Many people still refer to this generation as the 16-bit generation and often refer to the third generation as "8-bit".

It starts with a black screen. A woman’s voice. She speaks Japanese, and your eyes are wired to the subtitles. You have waited many months – if not years – for this game. Finally, you are sitting here. With sweaty hands and light in your eyes. The rest of the world disappeared around you, when you inserted the game disk into your console. Now it is only you, your controller and a long game. The graphics come up on the screen, the familiar melody starts to play, and your head explodes in a wild euphoria. FINALLY!
1 Adventure in the Park 2 Air Hockey 3 Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle 4 Alien Storm 5 Altered Beast 6 Arrow Flash 7 Black Sheep 8 Bomber 9 Bonanza Bros. 10 Bottle Taps Race 11 Brain Switch 12 Break the Fireline 13 Bubbles Master 14 Cannon 15 Checker 16 Chess 17 Columns 18 Columns III 19 Comix Zone 20 Crack Down 21 Cross the road 22 Curling 2010 23 Decap Attack 24 Dinosaur Puzzle 25 Dominant Amber 26 Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine 27 ESWAT: City Under Siege 28 Eternal Champions 29 Fatal Labyrinth 30 Fight or Lose 31 Flash Memory 32 Flicky 33 Gain Ground 34 Golden Axe 35 Golden Axe II 36 Golden Axe III 37 Hexagonos 38 Hidden Agenda 39 Hide and Seek 40 Jack's Pea 41 Jewel Magic 42 Jewel Master 43 Jura Formula 44 Kid Chameleon 45 Lost World Sudoku 46 Mahjong Solitaire 47 Meatloaf Rotation 48 Mega Brain Switch 49 Memory 50 Mirror Mirror 51 Mortal Kombat 52 Mortal Kombat II 53 Mortal Kombat III 54 Mr. Balls 55 Mya Master Mind 56 Naval Power 57 Panic Lift 58 Phantasy Star 3: Generations Of Doom 59 Phantasy Star II 60 Plumbing Contest 61 Ptero Spotting 62 Ristar 63 Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi 64 Shining Force II: The Ancient Seal 65 Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention 66 Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master 67 Skeleton Scale 68 Snake 69 Sonic & Knuckles 70 Sonic Spinball 71 Sonic the Hedgehog 72 Sonic the Hedgehog II 73 Spider 74 Super Thunder Blade 75 The Ooze 76 Vectorman 77 Virtua Fighter II 78 Wall-Breaking 79 Warehouse Keeper 80 Whack-a-Wolf 81 Yawning Triceratops
Bought as a present for someone who's very much into 8-bit retro gaming and he loves it. Console itself looks good and it all works perfectly. Would have been nice if the wireless joysticks weren't quite so directional - but more of a minor gripe. Joysticks are authentic Atari i.e. adequate but not great. There are joystick ports on the front so you could use any better ones you may have kicking around. One thing to watch is that the TV connectors are AV rather than HDMI (wasn't an issue for me).
Here is the complete list of Genesis games: Alex Kidd, Alien Storm, Altered Beast, Arrow Flash, Bonanza Brothers, Chakan, Columns, Columns 3, Comix Zone, Crack Down, Decap Attack, Ecco, Ecco 2, Ecco Jr., E-Swat, Eternal Champions, Fatal Labyrinth, Flicky, Gain Ground, Golden Axe (all three), Jewel Master, Kid Chameleon, Mean Bean Machine, Ristar, Shadow Dancer, Shinobi III, Sonic 3D Blast, Sonic and Knuckles, Sonic Spinball, Sonic the Hedgehog (1 & 2), Streets of Rage (all 3), The Ooze, Vectorman (1 & 2), and Virtua Fighter 2.
Action-adventures is a mixed genre. The reason we include them separately, is that there are so many of these games, that they make up their own genre. Here action element (often in the form of a shooter) is combined with adventure element, where the player needs to solve different tasks. Action-adventure games take their point of departure in many types of fiction genres like gangster genre (Grand Theft Auto), modern action (Tomb Raider) and horror genre (Resident Evil).

First graphic computer games in history were developed by the American computer scientist Alexander Douglas, who in 1952 created tic-tac-toe for a so-called EDSAC computer. The game never spread, because the computer was made exclusively for Cambridge University. The first computer game that could be played by several people at the same time was “Spacewar!” from 1962. The game was developed by the American programmer Steve Russell. It could be played by two people with joysticks, who could shoot down each other’s spaceships with missiles.

When it comes to gaming, Argos are champions. We are your one stop shop whether you need a PS4 console, Xbox One console or, if you fancy playing on the go, a Nintendo Switch. The contest between Microsoft and Sony is fierce, with both releasing high spec versions of their consoles for dedicated fans, the Xbox One X and PS4 Pro respectively. Sony have even re-released their original PlayStation as the PlayStation Classic, which comes preloaded with classic games.
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