This is a list of home video game consoles in chronological order, which includes the very first home video game consoles ever created, such as first generation Pong consoles, from the first ever cartridge console Odyssey, ranging from the major video game companies such as Magnavox, Atari, Nintendo, Sega, NEC, 3DO, SNK, Sony, Microsoft to secondary market consoles.

When it comes to console gaming, it is important to take care of the equipment, and if you search well on this page, you can, without a doubt, find exactly what you need. When you buy a PS4, you will of course always receive at least one PS4 controller included. So as a starting point, there is nothing else you need to buy separately or before you get it in the mail. However, there are some things that can create the need for a new controller. For example, imagine that you were a little generous with the soda and spilled it onto your PS4 controller and it is obvious that it does not work anymore. If that happens, you need only to go in and find a new PS4 controller. You might very well end up buying a controller that is far better than the one you bought before.


The first fifth-generation consoles were the Amiga CD32, 3DO and the Atari Jaguar. Although all three consoles were more powerful than the fourth generation systems, none of them would become serious threats to Sega or Nintendo. The 3DO initially generated a great deal of hype in part because of a licensing scheme where 3DO licensed the manufacturing of its console out to third parties, similar to VCR or DVD players. However, unlike its competitors who could sell their consoles at a loss, all 3DO manufacturers had to sell for profit. The Jaguar had three processors and no C libraries to help developers cope with it. Atari was ineffective at courting third parties and many of their first party games were poorly received. Many of the Jaguar's games used mainly the slowest (but most familiar) of the console's processors, resulting in titles that could easily have been released on the SNES or Genesis.

We researched and evaluated seven gaming consoles to recommend the best ones for your family gaming and entertainment needs. Our overall winner is the Xbox One X. The console has a full artillery of features, powerful hardware and a large selection of current and backwards-compatible games that are fun for new and seasoned gamers of all ages to enjoy. With the Xbox One X, you have access to free apps for streaming videos, listening to music, watching sports, getting gaming news and even chatting online. 


Meanwhile, the commercial failure of the Virtual Boy reportedly did little to alter Nintendo's development approach and focus on innovation.[31] According to Game Over, Nintendo laid blame for the machine's faults directly on its creator, Gunpei Yokoi.[39] The commercial failure of the Virtual Boy was said by members of the video game press to be a contributing factor to Yokoi's withdrawal from Nintendo, although he had planned to retire years prior and finished another more successful project for the company, the Game Boy Pocket, which was released shortly before his departure.[40]
In addition to the Genesis titles, you also get 40 games that look like homemade jobs. These have names like Treasure Hunt, Spider, Cross the Road, and Mr. Balls. Most are puzzle/memory style games. I tried about six and couldn't stomach any of them. You'd need to be really bored to resort to these, but thanks to the fine selection of Genesis games, you'll never have to.
This is a list of home video game consoles in chronological order, which includes the very first home video game consoles ever created, such as first generation Pong consoles, from the first ever cartridge console Odyssey, ranging from the major video game companies such as Magnavox, Atari, Nintendo, Sega, NEC, 3DO, SNK, Sony, Microsoft to secondary market consoles.

A major new addition to the market was the trend for corporations to include a large number of "non-gaming" features into their handheld consoles, including cell phones, MP3 players, portable movie players, and PDA-like features. The handheld that started this trend was Nokia's N-Gage, which was released in 2003 and doubled primarily as a mobile phone. It went through a redesign in 2004 and was renamed the N-Gage QD. A second handheld, the Zodiac from Tapwave, was released in 2004; based on the Palm OS, it offered specialized gaming-oriented video and sound capabilities, but it had an unwieldy development kit due to the underlying Palm OS foundation. With more and more PDAs arriving during the previous generation, the difference between consumer electronics and traditional computing began to blur and cheap console technology grew as a result. It was said of PDAs that they were "the computers of handheld gaming" because of their multi-purpose capabilities and the increasingly powerful computer hardware that resided within them. This capability existed to move gaming beyond the last generation's 16-bit limitations; however, PDAs were still geared towards the typical businessman and lacked new, affordable software franchises to compete with dedicated handheld gaming consoles.
The Switch is for people who really like Nintendo’s own games. Although other publishers do occasionally support the console (Switch can run Fortnite and Minecraft, for example) it’s the beautiful homegrown titles, such as Super Mario, Mario Kart and The Legend of Zelda, that most Switch owners are here for. Its online store is also packed with most of the best smaller independent games of the past few years.
Virtual life games have come from strategy genre, but the competition element here is replaced with care for the characters, construction of scenarios and home as a central topic. In The Sims you can, for example, design a family and a house for them, and let different dramas play themselves out. The central game activity is in controlling the characters’ actions, which develops their life in a certain direction.
A games console is the perfect Christmas present – it’s exciting, it’s cool and everyone can join in on the day (as long as you’ve had the foresight to sneak it out of its packaging on Christmas Eve to download the inevitable six hours of system updates). But selecting which machine to opt for is complicated and confusing, and if you get it wrong you may end up with yet another unloved gadget crammed in the cupboard where you keep the air fryer and mini candyfloss machine.
You are bidding on a Sega Mega Drive 2 console with 12 game cartridges, all has been tried and tested and works and plays fine, you will receive 1 X console, 1 X PowerPack, 2 X official control pads, 1 X tv/RF lead, The games have also been tested and play fine they are, Mega BomberMan (case and instructions), Street Fighter 2 (case and instructions), Lemmings (case and instructions), Sylvester & Tweety in cagey capers (case and instructions), Tiny Toon adventures Busters hidden treasure (case no instructions), College Football (case and instructions), the next 6 games are just the cartridge, Sonic the hedgehog 1 2, Sonic & Knuckles, Altered Beast, Barkley shut up and Jam, Arnold Palmers Tournament Golf, Any questions please ask,
Though, you’ll note, these are almost entirely Sega-published games, with the exception of the Mortal Kombat titles. And even then, we’re missing a lot of Sega classics, like ToeJam & Earl, all of the Streets of Rage titles (!) and Sega’s sports titles. And since there are no other third-party titles, that means no iconic Genesis titles like Aladdin, Earthworm Jim, Gunstar Heroes, Castlevania: Bloodlines and Contra Hard Corps. Also, no NBA Jam.
Though, you’ll note, these are almost entirely Sega-published games, with the exception of the Mortal Kombat titles. And even then, we’re missing a lot of Sega classics, like ToeJam & Earl, all of the Streets of Rage titles (!) and Sega’s sports titles. And since there are no other third-party titles, that means no iconic Genesis titles like Aladdin, Earthworm Jim, Gunstar Heroes, Castlevania: Bloodlines and Contra Hard Corps. Also, no NBA Jam.
eBay offers a wide range of games for all systems. Best-selling new releases like Batman: Return to Arkham or LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens, as well as classic old-school RPG video games like Baldur's Gate or The Elder Scrolls series are affordably priced on eBay. As technology moves at a rapid pace, many consoles get discontinued and become impossible to buy at regular stores. Here's where eBay comes in. Here can find an ongoing auction for any kind of game console you can think of. Looking for a video game from your childhood? It's yours again with a few clicks! With eBay, there's no such thing as obsolete software because you can always buy the obsolete hardware to go with it!

The Nintendo Switch is the first Nintendo console to utilize a paid online system instead of a free one. The new service is necessary to play online, and allows users to play emulated games from the Virtual Console service. The paid service was officially launched in 2018, although a free trial of many of its features had been available up until then. The system offers digital software downloads through the Nintendo eShop directly from the console, cloud save backups, and facilitates voice chat and party matching in multiplayer online titles such as Splatoon 2, through use of an external smartphone application.
These faults could all be overlooked if the included games ran well, but again, prepare for disappointment: nearly every game exhibits constant frame drops. It appears as though auto-frame-skip is being used to account for inefficient emulation of real Genesis hardware. For some games, such as the excellent strategy game Shining Force, this isn't a huge deal. But when you're playing Sonic The Hedgehog, a game known for being fast and smooth, the missing frames and choppy animation are an undeniable source of frustration and disappointment. This doubles when playing a fighting game like Mortal Kombat or Virtua Fighter 2.

While there are more multiplatform games than exclusives, it’s important to keep in mind that most cross-platform games really only work on the latest Xbox and PlayStation devices, since those systems have such similar capabilities. Nintendo’s consoles, however, have fun and unique features but aren’t nearly as powerful as the others, which makes it harder for developers to create comparable versions of their games for Nintendo consoles. But with the advent of the Switch, Nintendo has begun collaborating with third-party game developer companies, and now games available on the Switch have improved greatly both graphics- and capacity-wise. The lesson here is to discover what kinds of games you and your family like to play, then choose a console that supports most of them.


When the 16bit Sega Mega Drive was first launched in the UK in 1990, it was an instant success, selling out on pre-sales alone. Hardly surprising considering its advanced graphics and gameplay, which had previously only been seen in the amusement arcades. The rival Super Nintendo was still two years away, so the Sony Mega Drive quickly became the dominant system, ultimately selling 30million units worldwide.
The VES continued to be sold at a profit after 1977, and both Bally (with their Home Library Computer in 1977) and Magnavox (with the Odyssey² in 1978) brought their own programmable cartridge-based consoles to the market. However, it was not until Atari released a conversion of the golden age arcade hit Space Invaders in 1980 for the Atari 2600 that the home console industry took off. Many consumers bought an Atari console so they could play Space Invaders at home. The unprecedented success of Space Invaders started the trend of console manufacturers trying to get exclusive rights to arcade titles, and the trend of advertisements for game consoles claiming to bring the arcade experience home. Throughout the early 1980s, other companies released video game consoles of their own. Many of the video game systems (e.g. ColecoVision) were technically superior to the Atari 2600, and marketed as improvements over the Atari 2600. However, Atari dominated the console market in the early 1980s.
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