Nintendo's NES Classic isn't just a convenient way to play beloved NES games: it's an easy-to use console that looks the part and plays games the way you remember with a few new quality-of-life features. Marketing and distribution woes aside, it's the best example of a multi-game classic console to date, precisely because it does what you expect without major caveats.


One trait that remains peculiar to the fourth generation is the huge number of exclusive games. Both Sega and Nintendo were very successful and their consoles developed massive libraries of games. Both consoles had to be programmed in assembly to get the most out of them. A game optimized for the Genesis could take advantage of its faster CPU and sound chip. A game optimized for the SNES could take advantage of its graphics and its flexible, clean sound chip. Some game series, like Castlevania, saw separate system exclusive releases rather than an attempt to port one game to disparate platforms. When compact disc (CD) technology became available midway through the fourth generation, each company attempted to integrate it into their existing consoles in different ways. NEC and Sega released CD add-ons to their consoles in the form of the TurboGrafx-CD and Sega CD, but both were only moderately successful. NEC also released the TurboDuo which combined the TurboGrafx-16 and its TurboGrafx-CD add-on (along with the RAM and BIOS upgrade from the Super System Card) into one unit. SNK released a third version of the NeoGeo, the Neo Geo CD, allowing the company to release its games on a cheaper medium than the AES's expensive cartridges, but it reached the market after Nintendo and Sega had already sold tens of millions of consoles each. Nintendo partnered with Sony to work on a CD add-on for the SNES, but the deal fell apart when they realized how much control Sony wanted. Sony would use their work with Nintendo as the basis for their PlayStation game console. While CDs became an increasingly visible part of the market, CD-reading technology was still expensive in the 1990s, limiting NEC's and Sega's add-ons' sales.
Born from a failed attempt to create a console with Nintendo, Sony's PlayStation would not only dominate its generation but become the first console to sell over 100 million units by expanding the video game market. Sony actively courted third parties and provided them with convenient c libraries to write their games. Sony had built the console from the start as a 3D, disc-based system, and emphasized its 3D graphics that would come to be viewed as the future of gaming. The PlayStation's CD technology won over several developers who had been releasing titles for Nintendo and Sega's fourth generation consoles, such as Konami, Namco, Capcom, and Square. CDs were far cheaper to manufacture and distribute than cartridges were, meaning developers could release larger batches of games at higher profit margins; Nintendo's console, on the other hand, used cartridges, unwittingly keeping third-party developers away. The PlayStation's internal architecture was simpler and more intuitive to program for, giving the console an edge over Sega's Saturn.

Sega Genesis Classic Game Console does for the Genesis what the Flashback series did for the Atari 2600. It resurrects a classic console with a compact design, excellent controllers, and a slew of built-in games. The system itself is tiny with two buttons (power and reset), two controller ports, and a cartridge slot. That's right - this thing can play real Genesis cartridges!
1 Adventure in the Park 2 Air Hockey 3 Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle 4 Alien Storm 5 Altered Beast 6 Arrow Flash 7 Black Sheep 8 Bomber 9 Bonanza Bros. 10 Bottle Taps Race 11 Brain Switch 12 Break the Fireline 13 Bubbles Master 14 Cannon 15 Checker 16 Chess 17 Columns 18 Columns III 19 Comix Zone 20 Crack Down 21 Cross the road 22 Curling 2010 23 Decap Attack 24 Dinosaur Puzzle 25 Dominant Amber 26 Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine 27 ESWAT: City Under Siege 28 Eternal Champions 29 Fatal Labyrinth 30 Fight or Lose 31 Flash Memory 32 Flicky 33 Gain Ground 34 Golden Axe 35 Golden Axe II 36 Golden Axe III 37 Hexagonos 38 Hidden Agenda 39 Hide and Seek 40 Jack's Pea 41 Jewel Magic 42 Jewel Master 43 Jura Formula 44 Kid Chameleon 45 Lost World Sudoku 46 Mahjong Solitaire 47 Meatloaf Rotation 48 Mega Brain Switch 49 Memory 50 Mirror Mirror 51 Mortal Kombat 52 Mortal Kombat II 53 Mortal Kombat III 54 Mr. Balls 55 Mya Master Mind 56 Naval Power 57 Panic Lift 58 Phantasy Star 3: Generations Of Doom 59 Phantasy Star II 60 Plumbing Contest 61 Ptero Spotting 62 Ristar 63 Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi 64 Shining Force II: The Ancient Seal 65 Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention 66 Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master 67 Skeleton Scale 68 Snake 69 Sonic & Knuckles 70 Sonic Spinball 71 Sonic the Hedgehog 72 Sonic the Hedgehog II 73 Spider 74 Super Thunder Blade 75 The Ooze 76 Vectorman 77 Virtua Fighter II 78 Wall-Breaking 79 Warehouse Keeper 80 Whack-a-Wolf 81 Yawning Triceratops
Since this PS4 controller is completely new, there are also some new functions that you cannot find in the earlier ones. Amongst other things, it has a touchpad on the front, which has never been seen before. There are many experienced players that are very ecstatic about this new touchpad feature, which is both a technological advance and something that allows to experience new forms of games.
The games run badly. In fact, they ran so badly on the first unit AtGames sent me — the same unit that other outlets reviewed back in July (!) — that the company told me it had an issue with the emulation software and asked me to not review it, in order to give them a chance to send me an updated unit. A reasonable request, considering the product wouldn’t be released until late October, albeit curious why a subpar product was sent to reviewers that far in advance of release in the first place.
During the sixth generation era, the handheld game console market expanded with the introduction of new devices from many different manufacturers. Nintendo maintained its dominant share of the handheld market with the release in 2001 of the Game Boy Advance, which featured many upgrades and new features over the Game Boy. Two redesigns of this system followed, the Game Boy Advance SP in 2003 and the Game Boy Micro in 2005. Also introduced were the Neo Geo Pocket Color in 1998 and Bandai's WonderSwan Color, launched in Japan in 1999. South Korean company Game Park introduced its GP32 handheld in 2001, and with it came the dawn of open source handheld consoles. The Game Boy Advance line of handhelds has sold 81.51 million units worldwide as of September 30, 2010.[47]
The term "video game console" is primarily used to distinguish a console machine primarily designed for consumers to use for playing video games, in contrast to arcade machines or home computers. An arcade machine consists of a video game computer, display, game controller (joystick, buttons, etc.) and speakers housed in large chassis. A home computer is a personal computer designed for home use for a variety of purposes, such as bookkeeping, accessing the Internet and playing video games. While arcades and computers are generally expensive or highly “technical” devices, video game consoles were designed with affordability and accessibility to the general public in mind.
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