Today's games are bigger, better, and more immersive than ever. You can find incredible games across a wide range of genres. Most major game franchises are available on both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, while the Nintendo Switch offers a large selection of games suited for kids and families. For the most realistic visual experiences, upgrade to the PlayStation 4 Pro or Xbox One S to enjoy breathtaking 4K and HDR gaming. Exclusive titles are available for each console, which further underscores the need to plan ahead and pick up the right system for your must-own games. Explore the massive collections of previously played games at great deals and give your older consoles like the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Nintendo Wii U continued life.


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The first handheld game console released in the fourth generation was the Game Boy, on April 21, 1989. It went on to dominate handheld sales by an extremely large margin, despite featuring a low-contrast, unlit monochrome screen while all three of its leading competitors had color. Three major franchises made their debut on the Game Boy: Tetris, the Game Boy's killer application; Pokémon; and Kirby. With some design (Game Boy Pocket, Game Boy Light) and hardware (Game Boy Color) changes, it continued in production in some form until 2008, enjoying a better than 18-year run. The Atari Lynx included hardware-accelerated color graphics, a backlight, and the ability to link up to sixteen units together in an early example of network play when its competitors could only link 2 or 4 consoles (or none at all),[25] but its comparatively short battery life (approximately 4.5 hours on a set of alkaline cells, versus 35 hours for the Game Boy), high price, and weak games library made it one of the worst-selling handheld game systems of all time, with less than 500,000 units sold.[26][27]
However, Sega's success ultimately proved to be short-lived. Sony announced their own upcoming system, the PlayStation 2, in the fall of 1999; while they had few details on their system, many consumers ultimately held off on buying a system until Sony's own system launched. The PS2 released a year later and received immense critical acclaim. The PS2 quickly outsold the Dreamcast, eventually going on to become the best-selling video game console of all time while the Dreamcast's own sales stagnated.

Overall, it's a good system. But, mine was extremely dirty. Everything was covered with a layer of dirt. But, the biggest issue is there is no HDMI. Which is lame, especially when modern TVs only have HDMI in. Thankfully my Onkyo receiver can take composite and component in, so it works. Text looks horrid on 4K TVs, so stick with 1080p TVs if you want to play the RPGs on this console.


First released in Japan on October 21, 1998, the Game Boy Color (abbreviated as GBC) added a (slightly smaller) color screen to a form factor similar in size to the Game Boy Pocket. It also has double the processor speed, three times as much memory,[44] and an infrared communications port. Technologically, it was likened to the 8-bit NES video game console from the 1980s although the Game Boy Color has a much larger color palette (56 simultaneous colors out of 32,768 possible) which had some classical NES ports and newer titles. It comes in seven different colors; Clear purple, purple, red, blue, green, yellow and silver for the Pokémon edition. Like the Game Boy Light, the Game Boy Color takes on two AA batteries. It was the final handheld to have 8-bit graphics.
After the sluggish sales in Japan, Sega pursued a different strategy in other areas. The system launched in North America with 18 titles, including the much-anticipated Sonic Adventure. A big part of marketing their system to North America was taking advantage of the turn of the century and North America's tendency to end a products price tag with the number 9. They came up with the slogan "9/9/99 for $199", and the system initially sold briskly. Despite Japan having a year head start on North America, by the end of 1999 the Dreamcast had sold 2 million units in North America versus only 1 million in Japan, and at the end of the year Sega controlled 31% of the American video game market. The Dreamcast went on to launch in Europe on October 14, 1999 and in Australia on November 30, 1999.
Many believe that games are sheer entertainment: they are fun! And that can possibly make video games sound a little mundane – but there are countless gamers out there that see video games as exactly that: simple and comfortable way to pass time. There does not necessarily have to be an emotional connection to the game – it is played for sheer amusement.
Graphics processors keep getting updated, and video games follow suit, becoming more spectacular but also quite demanding. PC gamers are painfully familiar with the trend of needing a video card upgrade every couple of years when they want to play the latest games at an acceptable frame rate. But you don't need to be sitting around waiting for a new game's release date to come when eBay has such an enormous back-catalogue of older games to choose from!
Sega Genesis Classic Game Console does for the Genesis what the Flashback series did for the Atari 2600. It resurrects a classic console with a compact design, excellent controllers, and a slew of built-in games. The system itself is tiny with two buttons (power and reset), two controller ports, and a cartridge slot. That's right - this thing can play real Genesis cartridges! 

It is worth highlighting here that this console does support 720p, high-definition graphics. For all its other faults, it does deliver on that promise. While AtGames continues to sell the composite-only Genesis models, which literally won’t function properly on many new television sets, the inclusion of HDMI here is worth celebrating. Yes, Nintendo’s consoles have HDMI, and yes, the goalposts have most certainly moved. Yes, a $30 Raspberry Pi has enough horsepower to run Genesis games and also comes with an HDMI port. Yes, this should really be table stakes, but it hasn’t been an option for AtGames’ offerings until this model, so it’s worth highlighting here.
We then evaluated each console’s interface, looking for a smart layout that’s easy to use. We navigated through menus, adjusted the settings and compared ease of use. We approached this process twice over, first as gamers looking for quick access to new titles and already-installed games, and secondly as novice or non-gamer users looking for multimedia tools and apps. We found that the best consoles are the ones that make your favorite apps and games easy to access from a central place.
All seventh and eighth generation consoles offer some kind of Internet games distribution service, allowing users to download games for a fee onto some form of non-volatile storage, typically a hard disk or flash memory. Recently, the console manufacturers have been taking advantage of internet distribution with games, video streaming services like Netflix, Hulu Plus and film trailers being available.
The rapid-fire pace of technology means video game consoles are always changing, from the styling of the controls to the introduction of new video games. Through the ongoing evolution, you can rely on game consoles, such as Microsoft Xbox and Sony PlayStation, to deliver amazingly realistic graphics, dynamic sound quality, and supercharged play. From wireless controls to sleek console design, the video game consoles at RAC represent some of the more advanced gaming innovations available today.
When shopping on eBay for a Sony Mega drive, you should also look out for consoles labelled Sony Genesis. Sony Genesis was the name used for the Mega Drive in North America and these units are exactly the same. You should, however, always check that your console is PAL compatible for UK TV screens and doesn't use the alternative NTSC system found in Japanese models.
One of the most attractive aspects of this HDMI-enabled Genesis is that it supports actual cartridges, but again, things aren't as simple as they seem. In order for the system to read a game you need to insert it before powering on the console. While it would be nice to be able to swap cartridges without power cycling the console, it's not an egregious requirement. However, should you insert a cartridge that's dirty or unsupported, you need to remove and replace the cart and reboot the system to double check if it's the system's fault or the condition of the game itself, and endure a bootup screen and allow the cartridge to be dumped to RAM all over again. When a game does work, the system displays a screen with multiple instances of the same game. Which one do you pick? It's a game in and of itself. And unsurprisingly, the same frame rate performance issues noted above apply to cartridge-based games.
Sony's PlayStation 2 was released in Japan on March 4, 2000, in North America on October 26, 2000, in Europe on November 24, 2000, and in Australia on November 30, 2000. It was the follow-up to its highly successful PlayStation and was also the first home game console to be able to play DVDs. As was done with the original PlayStation in 2000, Sony redesigned the console in 2004 into a smaller version. As of November 21, 2011 over 140 million PlayStation 2 units have been sold.[45][46] This makes it the best selling home console of all time to date.

There are many different buttons on a controller and these buttons have never really changed much for this type of controller. The symbols that have always been there, are still there, and they will stay there. Some of the different buttons you can find on a PS4 controller are a PS button, “share” button, “options” button and direction buttons. There are also many different action buttons. Many know them for the geometric shapes on the buttons, which have over time become iconic and every player knows the difference between them and the function for each one. Those are triangle circle, x and a square.
Take menu navigation, for example. The d-pad on the controller is used to navigate the list of games on the right, but in order to scroll through categories, you have to use the B and C buttons. You can't pick a category using the d-pad and then proceed to use it for browsing games. In practice, you're using buttons on the right side of the controller to navigate items on the left side of the screen, and vice versa.
Overall, it's a good system. But, mine was extremely dirty. Everything was covered with a layer of dirt. But, the biggest issue is there is no HDMI. Which is lame, especially when modern TVs only have HDMI in. Thankfully my Onkyo receiver can take composite and component in, so it works. Text looks horrid on 4K TVs, so stick with 1080p TVs if you want to play the RPGs on this console.
^ Starting with Microsoft's fiscal quarter ending June 2014 (Q4), the company stopped divulging individual platform sales in their fiscal reports.[24][25] Microsoft stated it will shift focus to the amount of active users on Xbox Live starting in late 2015.[26] Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella unveiled at a December 3, 2014 shareholder presentation that 10 million units were sold.[27] Third-party estimates suggest sales reached approximately 25-30 million worldwide by late 2016.[28]
You can keep it in its dock to enjoy gaming in TV mode, remove it from its dock to play it in handheld mode or flip out its kickstand and set it on a table. The Switch’s battery life is decent but not outstanding and can last for anywhere from 2.5 to 6.5 hours depending on how intense the game is. The Switch’s controllers – called Joy-Cons – are equally versatile. Each one can slide onto a side of the tablet, creating a comfortable and immersive handheld experience. Or you and a friend can each use a Joy-Con for multiplayer fun. The Switch also comes with a controller frame that you can slide the Joy-Cons onto, or you can buy the Pro controller for a more traditional experience. With the Switch, Nintendo continues its tradition of making gaming devices with simple, intuitive interfaces and family-friendly game titles. You’ll have access to exclusive game franchises like Mario, Xenoblade Chronicles and Zelda. Additionally, Nintendo has now opened the door for third-party indie developers to create games for the Switch, so you’ll have access to additional titles – and even cross-platform titles like Splatoon 2, Disgaea 5, Rayman Legends, Minecraft, Stardew Valley and Skyrim.
When it comes to gaming, Argos are champions. We are your one stop shop whether you need a PS4 console, Xbox One console or, if you fancy playing on the go, a Nintendo Switch. The contest between Microsoft and Sony is fierce, with both releasing high spec versions of their consoles for dedicated fans, the Xbox One X and PS4 Pro respectively. Sony have even re-released their original PlayStation as the PlayStation Classic, which comes preloaded with classic games.
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