Microsoft kicked off the seventh generation with the release of the Xbox 360 on November 22, 2005, in the United States, December 2, 2005, in Europe, December 10, 2005, in Japan and March 23, 2006, in Australia. It featured market-leading processing power until the Sony PlayStation 3 was released one year later. While the original Xbox 360 "Core" did not include an internal HDD, most Xbox 360 models since have included at least the option to have one. The Xbox 360 optical drive is a DVD9 reader, allowing DVD movies to be played. No Blu-ray drive was included, making big games like Battlefield and Wolfenstein: The New Order require two or more DVDs to play. Up to four controllers can be connected to the console wirelessly on the standard 2.4 GHz spectrum. There are 4 discontinued versions of the Xbox 360: the "Arcade," the "Pro," and the "Elite," and the newer "S" or 'slim' model. The "E" version of the Xbox 360 included 3 configurations: a 4GB internal SSD version which acts like a USB hard drive, a 250 GB HDD version, and a branded 320 GB HDD version. The Xbox 360 is backward compatible with about half the games of the original Xbox library. In 2010, Microsoft released Kinect, allowing for motion-controlled games. The Xbox 360 was discontinued on April 20, 2016.

Virtual life games have come from strategy genre, but the competition element here is replaced with care for the characters, construction of scenarios and home as a central topic. In The Sims you can, for example, design a family and a house for them, and let different dramas play themselves out. The central game activity is in controlling the characters’ actions, which develops their life in a certain direction.


But knowledge of this, along with adjusting the parental controls on your console, makes any game console infinitely more kid-friendly. Beyond that, it comes down to game selection: If a console doesn’t have a variety of kid-friendly games, it probably isn’t the best choice for the family room. A handful of games on the Xbox and PlayStation are great for kids, but again, neither console is really geared toward children.
With it, you can browse games in the Official PlayStation Store, which has access to over 500 titles for when you need something new to play. You’ll have access to cross-platform titles, indie games and re-releases from past consoles along with more exclusive titles than any other console on the market, including Uncharted, Spider-Man and Driveclub. Though the console is the largest on the market, its modern design makes it look slim. Plus, its matte black exterior helps it blend in with your other electronics. It ships with a 1TB hard drive, though you can opt to upgrade it to 2TB or plug in an external hard drive. Inside, you’ll find a 2.1GHz eight-core AMD Jaguar CPU and a 4.2 TFLOP AMD Radeon-based graphics card, which is paired with 8GB of GDDR5 RAM. The powerful system consistently maintains 1080p output and high frame rates. The updated DualShock 4 controller boasts Bluetooth connectivity and can charge via micro-USB so you aren’t permanently tethered to your console. The glowing light bar located along the front of each controller helps identify player one from player two, and even adds a little atmospheric lighting. New features on the controller include a capacitive touch pad, a 3.5mm audio jack, a built-in speaker and a dedicated screen capture button for saving screenshots and sharing them online.
We all remember our first experience with a game console, whether it was in the local club, at a friend’s place or home in the living room. It was addictive – and we could not get enough. It can be difficult to choose, which game console to settle on – no matter if you are a hardcore fan of a certain console and go determinedly for the newest model, or if you are a beginner and have to make your first choice. To make it easier we will outline the different brands here:
The Sega Genesis Flashback is an attempt to capture a seemingly new, or at least reinvigorated, market while also not being too ambitious. At $80, the same price as the Super Nintendo Classic Edition, the Genesis Flashback struggles to approximate the user experience of Nintendo’s throwback. Instead, it tries to best it with back-of-the-box bullet points that, while impressive sounding, do little to cement its superiority.
Xbox One: With comparable performance to PS4 but a narrower selection of exclusive games, this console adds the ability to play 4K Blu-ray discs, to control your TV viewing and to connect with your PC (via the Xbox Play Anywhere feature), making it a good choice for people who want the console as a 4K media hub as well as to play games. It also has admirable accessibility support.
The SEGA Mega Drive (or SEGA Genesis in the USA!) was the best home video games consoles of its time and - 30 years on - still graces Top 10 lists to this day. The reason: a stunning collection of games which pushed the 16-bit platform to its limit. Sonic the Hedgehog brought zip and audacity to the side-scrolling platformer, while Mortal Kombat finally found a home console that could match its prestige. 

1 Adventure in the Park 2 Air Hockey 3 Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle 4 Alien Storm 5 Altered Beast 6 Arrow Flash 7 Black Sheep 8 Bomber 9 Bonanza Bros. 10 Bottle Taps Race 11 Brain Switch 12 Break the Fireline 13 Bubbles Master 14 Cannon 15 Checker 16 Chess 17 Columns 18 Columns III 19 Comix Zone 20 Crack Down 21 Cross the road 22 Curling 2010 23 Decap Attack 24 Dinosaur Puzzle 25 Dominant Amber 26 Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine 27 ESWAT: City Under Siege 28 Eternal Champions 29 Fatal Labyrinth 30 Fight or Lose 31 Flash Memory 32 Flicky 33 Gain Ground 34 Golden Axe 35 Golden Axe II 36 Golden Axe III 37 Hexagonos 38 Hidden Agenda 39 Hide and Seek 40 Jack's Pea 41 Jewel Magic 42 Jewel Master 43 Jura Formula 44 Kid Chameleon 45 Lost World Sudoku 46 Mahjong Solitaire 47 Meatloaf Rotation 48 Mega Brain Switch 49 Memory 50 Mirror Mirror 51 Mortal Kombat 52 Mortal Kombat II 53 Mortal Kombat III 54 Mr. Balls 55 Mya Master Mind 56 Naval Power 57 Panic Lift 58 Phantasy Star 3: Generations Of Doom 59 Phantasy Star II 60 Plumbing Contest 61 Ptero Spotting 62 Ristar 63 Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi 64 Shining Force II: The Ancient Seal 65 Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention 66 Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master 67 Skeleton Scale 68 Snake 69 Sonic & Knuckles 70 Sonic Spinball 71 Sonic the Hedgehog 72 Sonic the Hedgehog II 73 Spider 74 Super Thunder Blade 75 The Ooze 76 Vectorman 77 Virtua Fighter II 78 Wall-Breaking 79 Warehouse Keeper 80 Whack-a-Wolf 81 Yawning Triceratops

Virtual life games have come from strategy genre, but the competition element here is replaced with care for the characters, construction of scenarios and home as a central topic. In The Sims you can, for example, design a family and a house for them, and let different dramas play themselves out. The central game activity is in controlling the characters’ actions, which develops their life in a certain direction.

But the Genesis Flashback also wisely includes the standard DB9 port that the original Genesis had, meaning your old (or eBay-acquired!) controllers will work just fine on the Flashback, a major improvement from the SNES Classic’s bizarre choice to use a Wiimote expansion port. The negative on that one? AtGames throws in not bad, but not excellent, wireless controllers instead of taking the opportunity to offer excellent wired controllers. Another negative: You will have to use the six-button Genesis controller, even though many of the included games don’t require it. No three-button pads allowed.
In 1983, Nintendo released the Family Computer (or Famicom) in Japan. The Famicom supported high-resolution sprites, larger color palettes, and tiled backgrounds. This allowed Famicom games to be longer and have more detailed graphics. Nintendo began attempts to bring their Famicom to the U.S. after the video game market had crashed. In the U.S., video games were seen as a fad that had already passed. To distinguish its product from older game consoles, Nintendo released their Famicom as the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) which used a front-loading cartridge port similar to a VCR, included a plastic "robot" (R.O.B.), and was initially advertised as a toy. The NES was the highest selling console in the history of North America and revitalized the video game market. Mario of Super Mario Bros. became a global icon starting with his NES games. Nintendo took a somewhat unusual stance with third-party developers for its console. Nintendo contractually restricted third-party developers to three NES titles per year and forbade them from developing for other video game consoles. The practice ensured Nintendo's market dominance and prevented the flood of trash titles that had helped kill the Atari, but was ruled illegal late in the console's lifecycle.[23]
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