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When the 16bit Sega Mega Drive was first launched in the UK in 1990, it was an instant success, selling out on pre-sales alone. Hardly surprising considering its advanced graphics and gameplay, which had previously only been seen in the amusement arcades. The rival Super Nintendo was still two years away, so the Sony Mega Drive quickly became the dominant system, ultimately selling 30million units worldwide.
The VES continued to be sold at a profit after 1977, and both Bally (with their Home Library Computer in 1977) and Magnavox (with the Odyssey² in 1978) brought their own programmable cartridge-based consoles to the market. However, it was not until Atari released a conversion of the golden age arcade hit Space Invaders in 1980 for the Atari 2600 that the home console industry took off. Many consumers bought an Atari console so they could play Space Invaders at home. The unprecedented success of Space Invaders started the trend of console manufacturers trying to get exclusive rights to arcade titles, and the trend of advertisements for game consoles claiming to bring the arcade experience home. Throughout the early 1980s, other companies released video game consoles of their own. Many of the video game systems (e.g. ColecoVision) were technically superior to the Atari 2600, and marketed as improvements over the Atari 2600. However, Atari dominated the console market in the early 1980s.
The wireless controllers do include two notable enhancements on the original Genesis controllers (and the SNES Classic controllers, for that matter): a Menu button, giving players access to the system’s UI from the couch, and a Rewind button, letting them quickly access what is essentially an undo function for video games. If you opt for the six-button Genesis controller, its Mode button serves as the Menu button here, and you can invoke the Rewind feature by pressing Back + Start. This is a thoughtful solution that, strangely, Nintendo still fails to adopt in its offerings.
Since this PS4 controller is completely new, there are also some new functions that you cannot find in the earlier ones. Amongst other things, it has a touchpad on the front, which has never been seen before. There are many experienced players that are very ecstatic about this new touchpad feature, which is both a technological advance and something that allows to experience new forms of games.
The Sega Genesis Flashback is an attempt to capture a seemingly new, or at least reinvigorated, market while also not being too ambitious. At $80, the same price as the Super Nintendo Classic Edition, the Genesis Flashback struggles to approximate the user experience of Nintendo’s throwback. Instead, it tries to best it with back-of-the-box bullet points that, while impressive sounding, do little to cement its superiority.
Whether you prefer sports, war simulation or racing; you’ll find the titles will keep you entertained with our range of PSP, Xbox, Playstation and PC games. Find all the accessories you need to complete your gaming experience from headphones and headsets to gaming chairs, controllers and memory cards. Not forgetting the consoles themselves, shop for a PS3, Xbox 360 or Nintendo Wii or if retro gaming is more your thing, a SNES or N64.
Bought as a present for someone who's very much into 8-bit retro gaming and he loves it. Console itself looks good and it all works perfectly. Would have been nice if the wireless joysticks weren't quite so directional - but more of a minor gripe. Joysticks are authentic Atari i.e. adequate but not great. There are joystick ports on the front so you could use any better ones you may have kicking around. One thing to watch is that the TV connectors are AV rather than HDMI (wasn't an issue for me).
From a slender elf to a trained macho assassin, many people spend a significant part of their life in a virtual world of computer games. Computer games are no longer the attribute of only nerds behind closed blinds but are played today by people of both genders and of all ages. Computer games can gather families for competitions in front of the flat screen and game enthusiasts from all over the world via the Internet, but they can also shield from strangers on the bus or from the complex world outside of the bedroom. Some are sceptic and anxious, while others cannot lower their arms from the excitement about the games’ learning potential.
Aside from the usual hardware enhancements, consoles of the eighth generation focus on further integration with other media and increased connectivity.[58] The Wii U introduced a controller/tablet hybrid whose features include the possibility of augmented reality in gaming.[59] The PlayStation 4 is Sony's eighth generation console, featuring a "share" button to stream video game content between devices, released on November 15, 2013. Microsoft released their next generation console, the Xbox One, on November 22, 2013.[60] On March 3, 2017, following poor sales of the Wii U, Nintendo released the Nintendo Switch, a 'hybrid' console consisting of a tablet with controller attachments that can be used as a mobile device or connected to a television via a dock.
Microsoft's Xbox was the first dedicated video game console released by the company in North America on November 15, 2001, in Japan on February 22, 2002, and in Europe and Australia on March 14, 2002. Microsoft realized the power of video game consoles and feared with growing capabilities they may take over more than the living room. It was the first console to employ a hard drive right out of the box to save games, the first to include an Ethernet port for broadband internet, and the beginning of Microsoft's online Xbox LIVE service. Microsoft was able to attract many PC developers by using the NT kernel and DirectX from their Windows operating system. Though criticized for its bulky size and the awkwardness of its original controller, the Xbox eventually gained popularity, especially in the US, where it outsold the GameCube to secure second place, due in part to the success of the Halo franchise.

Why stop your console gaming after you leave the couch? Take your home console gaming experience anywhere, any place you want with Nintendo Switch. Or enjoy the freedom of dedicated portable systems like the PlayStation Vita, Nintendo 3DS, 3DS XL, and 2DS that let you slay dragons, outrun zombies, or win the Stanley Cup while on the bus, during school break, or on a plane. Many of the larger franchise games on systems like PS4 and Xbox One also have companion apps for your smartphone or tablet, letting you do everything from chatting with teammates to customizing your in-game gear to participating in the thick of the action.
^ Bauscher, Dave. "allgame ( Sega Game Gear > Overview )". Allgame. Retrieved September 21, 2008. While this feature is not included on the Game Boy it does provide a disadvantage -- the Game Gear requires 6 AA batteries that only last up to six hours. The Nintendo Game Boy only requires 4 AA batteries and is capable of providing up to 35 hours of play.
But to say that you need to buy a controller is of course, a very wide approach, which you will quickly learn if you look around on the website. Maybe you think that you can just go to whatever website and point at a random PS4 controller and say that this one is exactly the one you need. But it will rarely be that easy, because you will often see that there are many options, so it can be hard to choose. One of those options is a Sony Dualshock 4. And when you are that far in, you also need the right colour, and here you can, for example, choose the fresh Steel black colour. It is black, but it also has a nice grey overlay, and will definitely stand out next to the original PS4 controller that you got with the console.

Nearly a year later, we are now experiencing the fallout of the NES Classic's success: the arrival of competing classic consoles. This in theory is good news, but there's something important to keep in mind: Nintendo had direct control over the NES Classic. It understood the hardware, the games, and most importantly, how to deliver a user-friendly device that worked as expected. Without those advantages, any company producing a similar device faces an uphill battle in the face of passionate fans on the lookout for an authentic experience.
^ Starting with Microsoft's fiscal quarter ending June 2014 (Q4), the company stopped divulging individual platform sales in their fiscal reports.[24][25] Microsoft stated it will shift focus to the amount of active users on Xbox Live starting in late 2015.[26] Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella unveiled at a December 3, 2014 shareholder presentation that 10 million units were sold.[27] Third-party estimates suggest sales reached approximately 25-30 million worldwide by late 2016.[28]
Xbox One: With comparable performance to PS4 but a narrower selection of exclusive games, this console adds the ability to play 4K Blu-ray discs, to control your TV viewing and to connect with your PC (via the Xbox Play Anywhere feature), making it a good choice for people who want the console as a 4K media hub as well as to play games. It also has admirable accessibility support.
The third major handheld of the fourth generation was the Game Gear. It featured graphics capabilities roughly comparable to the Master System (better colours, but lower resolution), a ready made games library by using the "Master-Gear" adapter to play cartridges from the older console, and the opportunity to be converted into a portable TV using a cheap tuner adaptor, but it also suffered some of the same shortcomings as the Lynx. While it sold more than twenty times as many units as the Lynx, its bulky design - slightly larger than even the original Game Boy; relatively poor battery life - only a little better than the Lynx; and later arrival in the marketplace - competing for sales amongst the remaining buyers who didn't already have a Game Boy - hampered its overall popularity despite being more closely competitive to the Nintendo in terms of price and breadth of software library.[28] Sega eventually retired the Game Gear in 1997, a year before Nintendo released the first examples of the Game Boy Color, to focus on the Nomad and non-portable console products. Other handheld consoles released during the fourth generation included the TurboExpress, a handheld version of the TurboGrafx-16 released by NEC in 1990, and the Game Boy Pocket, an improved model of the Game Boy released about two years before the debut of the Game Boy Color. While the TurboExpress was another early pioneer of color handheld gaming technology and had the added benefit of using the same game cartridges or 'HuCards' as the TurboGrafx16, it had even worse battery life than the Lynx and Game Gear - about three hours on six contemporary AA batteries - selling only 1.5 million units.[27]
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