These games speak for themselves: typical simulations or arcade games of different types of sports. The games we are looking at here offer a lot of entertainment and have an online function with a base of players from all over the world. This genre has never been bigger, and it is closely tied to the real world. The players you see in these games create an authenticity to the sports games that other genres are striving to provide. It can be, for example, football, hockey or racing. In any case, the players’ success depends on being able to get an overview of the game and act fast. The competition is the main element here, which also means these games add another type of online socializing. That is exactly what makes them so unique in comparison to other genres. FIFA is the standard-bearer here – you can find it, and many others, at Coolshop.
Playing games is about entertainment and company, fun and adventure. It is about an escape from reality. With a game from Coolshop you can be exactly who you want to be. You can save the world in the past, future and present – and destroy it again. Explore habitable planets, underground caves and abandoned buildings. Save princesses and fight monsters.

I have an old Sega that doesn't work so when I saw this I was excited. My friend also bought one and loves it. 80 games is more like 40. There are a lot of titles and I only play about 5 of them. It is hard to get your cartridges in but that becomes easier with time. If you're truly an enthusiast you will notice some small changes in sound, color and game play. For the most part it's not that big of a difference. The truly annoying part is the controllers. Wireless yes, however they must be pointed right at the console to work and I do mean right at. I used my old controllers. At the end of the day I think that this should be about half the price. AtGames is a Chinese company who bought the licensing rights to Sega as well as some other retro games like Atari. You can find old games pretty easy online. A good trick is to put alcohol on a Q-tip and clean the cartridge. Good luck!
Overall, it's a good system. But, mine was extremely dirty. Everything was covered with a layer of dirt. But, the biggest issue is there is no HDMI. Which is lame, especially when modern TVs only have HDMI in. Thankfully my Onkyo receiver can take composite and component in, so it works. Text looks horrid on 4K TVs, so stick with 1080p TVs if you want to play the RPGs on this console.

Compilations of Sega Genesis games have been released for other consoles. These include Sonic Mega Collection and Sonic Gems Collection for PS2, Xbox, and Nintendo GameCube; Sega Genesis Collection for PS2 and PSP, and Sonic's Ultimate Genesis Collection (known as the Sega Mega Drive Ultimate Collection in PAL territories) for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[157][158]
As a result of piracy in some countries and unlicensed development issues, Sega incorporated a technical protection mechanism into a new edition of the Genesis released in 1990, referred to as the Genesis III. This new variation of the Genesis included a code known as the Trademark Security System (TMSS), which, when a game cartridge was inserted, would check for the presence of the string "SEGA" at a particular point in the memory contained in the cartridge. If the string was present, the console would run the game, and would briefly display the message: "Produced by or under license from Sega Enterprises, Ltd."[72] This system had a twofold effect: it added extra protection against unlicensed developers and software piracy, and forced the Sega trademark to display when the game was powered up, making a lawsuit for trademark infringement possible if unlicensed software were to be developed.[73][76] Accolade learned of this development at the Winter Consumer Electronics Show in January 1991, where Sega showed the new Genesis III and demonstrated it screening and rejecting an Ishido game cartridge.[73] With more games planned for the following year, Accolade successfully identified the TMSS file. It later added this file to the games HardBall!, Star Control, Mike Ditka Power Football, and Turrican.[73]
In 1993, Sega introduced a smaller, lighter version of the console,[103] known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan, Europe, and Australia[d] and simply sold as Genesis (without the Sega prefix) in North America. This version omits the headphone jack in the front, replaces the A/V-Out connector with a smaller version that supports stereo sound, and provides a simpler, less expensive mainboard that requires less power.[106]
The newest heavy-duty console to hit the market – the Xbox One X – has 4K HDR playback and the most powerful gaming console processor on the market. The Xbox One S and PlayStation 4 Pro also have some 4K and/or HDR playback abilities, though to a lesser degree than the One X. Any of these is a smart choice if you have a compatible TV and access to 4K games and video, and they can make for the perfect binge session of Netflix’s latest 4K content.
The features introduced in this generation include the support of new disc formats: Blu-ray Disc, utilized by the PlayStation 3, and HD DVD supported by the Xbox 360 via an optional $200 external accessory addition, that was later discontinued as the format war closed. Another new technology is the use of motion as input, and IR tracking (as implemented on the Wii). Also, all seventh generation consoles support wireless controllers. This generation also introduced the Nintendo DS, and the Nintendo DSi, which brought touchscreens into the mainstream for and added cameras to portable gaming.
Due to technical constraints, Kelkoo cannot guarantee the complete accuracy, nor the completeness of the information provided by the merchants. As a result, and due to the nature of Kelkoo's activities, in the event of discrepancies between the information displayed on the Kelkoo website or ads and the one displayed on the merchant's website, the latter will prevail. Prices shown are including all fees, except for new vehicles (price incl. VAT and without application fees)
Nakayama received permission to proceed with this project, leading to the release of Sega's first home video game system, the SG-1000, in July 1983. The SG-1000 was not successful; while it had sold 160,000 units in Japan, far greater than any of Sega's arcade platforms, sales at stores were dominated by Nintendo's Famicom which had been released the same day. Sega estimated that the Family Computer outsold the SG-1000 by a 10-to-1 margin.[8] The SG-1000 was replaced by the Sega Mark III within two years.[9] In the meantime, Gulf & Western began to divest itself of its non-core businesses after the death of company founder Charles Bluhdorn,[10] so Nakayama and former Sega CEO David Rosen arranged a management buyout of the Japanese subsidiary in 1984 with financial backing from CSK Corporation, a prominent Japanese software company. Nakayama was then installed as CEO of the new Sega Enterprises, Ltd.[11]
Nintendo's Wii was released in North America on November 19, 2006, in Japan on December 2, 2006, in Australia on December 7, 2006, and in Europe on December 8, 2006. It is bundled with Wii Sports in all regions except for Japan. Unlike the other systems of the seventh generation, the Wii does not support an internal hard drive, but instead uses 512 MB of internal Flash memory and includes support for removable SD card storage. It also has a maximum resolution output of 480p, making it the only seventh generation console not able to output high-definition graphics. Along with its lower price, the Wii is notable for its unique controller, the Wii Remote, which resembles a TV remote. The system uses a "sensor bar" that emits infrared light that is detected by an infrared camera in the Wii Remote to determine orientation relative to the source of the light. All models, other than the Wii Family Edition and the Wii Mini, are backwards compatible with GameCube games and support up to four GameCube controllers and two memory cards. It also includes the Virtual Console, which allows the purchase and downloading of games from older systems, including those of former competitors. In 2009, Nintendo introduced the 'Wii MotionPlus' expansion, which uses the same technology as the console previously used, but with enhanced motion tracking and sensing to improve gameplay quality.
In an effort to compete with Sega, third-party developer Catapult Entertainment created the XBAND, a peripheral which allowed Genesis players to engage in online competitive gaming. Using telephone services to share data, XBAND was initially offered in five U.S. cities in November 1994. The following year, the service was extended to the SNES, and Catapult teamed up with Blockbuster Video to market the service, but as interest in the service waned, it was discontinued in April 1997.[116]
We all remember our first experience with a game console, whether it was in the local club, at a friend’s place or home in the living room. It was addictive – and we could not get enough. It can be difficult to choose, which game console to settle on – no matter if you are a hardcore fan of a certain console and go determinedly for the newest model, or if you are a beginner and have to make your first choice. To make it easier we will outline the different brands here:
The advertised transaction is a rental-purchase agreement (rent-to-own agreement, consumer rental-purchase agreement or a lease/lease-purchase agreement, depending on your state). You will not own the merchandise until the total amount necessary to acquire ownership is paid in full or you exercise your early purchase option (“EPO”). Ownership is optional. MA and RI consumers: after the first 184 days, you may purchase the merchandise for 50% of the remaining Total Cost, plus applicable sales tax. Product availability and pricing may vary by store. Advertised offers good while supplies last and cannot be combined together or with any other promotions. See Store Manager for complete details. Consulta con el Gerente de la Tienda para los detalles completos. ”Closeout Corner” quantities are limited. Product, condition and selection vary by location. Participating locations only. Smaller Payments refers to reduced weekly rental rate and may not reduce total cost to own in all cases. See store for details.

The 16-bit era saw Nintendo at the peak of its creativity, releasing popular acclaimed games like The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and Super Metroid alongside cult hits like Earthbound. Third-party companies didn’t take a backseat, with Square Enix’ Final Fantasy VI and Konami’s Super Castlevania IV among the best games of the entire decade.
On December 5, 2007, Tec Toy released a portable version of the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive with twenty built-in games.[169] Another version called "Mega Drive Guitar Idol" comes with two six-button joypads and a guitar controller with five fret buttons. The Guitar Idol game contains a mix of Brazilian and international songs. The console has 87 built-in games, including some from Electronic Arts based on the mobile phone versions.[170]
However, Sega's success ultimately proved to be short-lived. Sony announced their own upcoming system, the PlayStation 2, in the fall of 1999; while they had few details on their system, many consumers ultimately held off on buying a system until Sony's own system launched. The PS2 released a year later and received immense critical acclaim. The PS2 quickly outsold the Dreamcast, eventually going on to become the best-selling video game console of all time while the Dreamcast's own sales stagnated.
PlayStation Vita is a handheld game console developed by Sony Computer Entertainment.[75] It is the successor to the PlayStation Portable as part of the PlayStation brand of gaming devices. It was released in Japan on December 17, 2011[76] and was released in Europe and North America on February 22, 2012.[77][78] The handheld includes two analog sticks, a 5-inch (130 mm) OLED/LCD multi-touch capacitive touchscreen, and supports Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and optional 3G. Internally, the PS Vita features a 4 core ARM Cortex-A9 MPCore processor and a 4 core SGX543MP4+ graphics processing unit, as well as LiveArea software as its main user interface, which succeeds the XrossMediaBar.[79][80]
The 32X was released in November 1994, in time for the holiday season. Demand among retailers was high, and Sega could not keep up orders for the system.[137] More than 1,000,000 orders had been placed for 32X units, but Sega had only managed to ship 600,000 units by January 1995.[127] Launching at about the same price as a Genesis console, the price of the 32X was less than half of what the Saturn's price would be at launch.[134] Despite the console's positioning as an inexpensive entry into 32-bit gaming, Sega had a difficult time convincing third-party developers to create games for the new system. After an early run on the peripheral, news soon spread to the public of the upcoming release of the Sega Saturn, which would not support the 32X's games. The Saturn was released on May 11, 1995,[139] four months earlier than its originally intended release date of September 2, 1995.[140] The Saturn, in turn, caused developers to further shy away from the console and created doubt about the library for the 32X, even with Sega's assurances that there would be a large number of games developed for the system. In early 1996, Sega conceded that it had promised too much out of the 32X and decided to stop producing the system in order to focus on the Saturn.[127] Prices for the 32X dropped to $99 and cleared out of stores at $19.95.[137]
The first handheld game console with interchangeable cartridges was the Microvision designed by Smith Engineering, and distributed and sold by Milton-Bradley in 1979. Crippled by a small, fragile LCD display and a very narrow selection of games, it was discontinued two years later. The Epoch Game Pocket Computer was released in Japan in 1984. The Game Pocket Computer featured an LCD screen with 75 X 64 resolution and could produce graphics at about the same level as early Atari 2600 games. The system sold very poorly, and as a result, only five games were made for it. Nintendo's Game & Watch series of dedicated game systems proved more successful. It helped to establish handheld gaming as popular and lasted until 1991. Many Game & Watch games were later re-released on Nintendo's subsequent handheld systems.
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