We all remember our first experience with a game console, whether it was in the local club, at a friend’s place or home in the living room. It was addictive – and we could not get enough. It can be difficult to choose, which game console to settle on – no matter if you are a hardcore fan of a certain console and go determinedly for the newest model, or if you are a beginner and have to make your first choice. To make it easier we will outline the different brands here:
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However, Sega's success ultimately proved to be short-lived. Sony announced their own upcoming system, the PlayStation 2, in the fall of 1999; while they had few details on their system, many consumers ultimately held off on buying a system until Sony's own system launched. The PS2 released a year later and received immense critical acclaim. The PS2 quickly outsold the Dreamcast, eventually going on to become the best-selling video game console of all time while the Dreamcast's own sales stagnated.
“The SEGA Mega Drive was my first console that I remember un-boxing then playing on for as long as I can remember – these consoles have brought those memories flooding back to me! They’re packed with the majority of my favourite games and the handheld has an SD card slot which is great for expanding your collection for those that are missing. The home console comes with 2 controllers (that’s right, you won’t be charged extra to play 2 player!) which is great for replaying all those classic multi-player games with a friend. The home console also has an original cartridge slot, so you can dust off all your old SEGA Mega Drive cartridges (or pick some up for cheap on eBay) and replay them in all their 16-bit glory!”
The world of tablets can be quite expensive. This is a great solution for people like me who don't want to commit to a tablet which costs hundreds of pounds. Build quality is great and feature are really good too. The Xbox controller is ace, it lets me play on my xbox whilst allowing my girlfriend to watch telly so we're both pleased! Totally recommend.

All seventh and eighth generation consoles offer some kind of Internet games distribution service, allowing users to download games for a fee onto some form of non-volatile storage, typically a hard disk or flash memory. Recently, the console manufacturers have been taking advantage of internet distribution with games, video streaming services like Netflix, Hulu Plus and film trailers being available.
Enough about HDMI support and the stupid logo — let me draw your attention to what’s just above it. The Flashback includes an actual cartridge slot, meaning that in addition to playing all the games that come pre-installed in the unit, it also supports any Genesis cartridge you already have. That’s a big one for the old positives column ... but whether you’re playing a game off a cartridge or off the system’s built-in library, the actual experience is the same: disappointing. While AtGames has earned a bad reputation for its cheap plug ‘n play systems, this year’s HDMI-enabled Flashback series was supposed to be a mea culpa of sorts for the brand; a recognition that mass producing shitty boxes that can barely reproduce the games they ostensibly contain won’t cut it in a post-Nintendo Classics lineup world. Unfortunately ...
Right, this is complicated. A Nintendo Switch costs around £280; an Xbox One S is around £200, an Xbox One X is £450; A PlayStation 4 is £250 and a PlayStation 4 Pro is £350. Those prices are for basic hardware packages. Spend a little more to pick up a bundle deal, which includes the console plus a game and possibly an extra controller, for roughly £50. With Black Friday approaching, it’s a good idea to see what deals retailers like Game, HMV, Argos, Amazon and supermarkets are offering.
There is no question of sitting carefully on a chair when you play with the wireless gamepads equipped with movement detectors (Wiimote control system). With Wii, you can play tennis, do yoga, boxing or jog, the Wii Fit game also provides you with a virtual coach to guide you install a complete training programme. This game console can store your user profile and enables you to test your physical condition.
We researched and evaluated seven gaming consoles to recommend the best ones for your family gaming and entertainment needs. Our overall winner is the Xbox One X. The console has a full artillery of features, powerful hardware and a large selection of current and backwards-compatible games that are fun for new and seasoned gamers of all ages to enjoy. With the Xbox One X, you have access to free apps for streaming videos, listening to music, watching sports, getting gaming news and even chatting online. 
Unlike similar consumer electronics such as music players and movie players, which use industry-wide standard formats, video game consoles use proprietary formats which compete with each other for market share.[1] There are various types of video game consoles, including home video game consoles, handheld game consoles, microconsoles and dedicated consoles. Although Ralph Baer had built working game consoles by 1966, it was nearly a decade before the Pong game made them commonplace in regular people's living rooms. Through evolution over the 1990s and 2000s, game consoles have expanded to offer additional functions such as CD players, DVD players, Blu-ray disc players, web browsers, set-top boxes and more.
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