Microsoft's Xbox was the first dedicated video game console released by the company in North America on November 15, 2001, in Japan on February 22, 2002, and in Europe and Australia on March 14, 2002. Microsoft realized the power of video game consoles and feared with growing capabilities they may take over more than the living room. It was the first console to employ a hard drive right out of the box to save games, the first to include an Ethernet port for broadband internet, and the beginning of Microsoft's online Xbox LIVE service. Microsoft was able to attract many PC developers by using the NT kernel and DirectX from their Windows operating system. Though criticized for its bulky size and the awkwardness of its original controller, the Xbox eventually gained popularity, especially in the US, where it outsold the GameCube to secure second place, due in part to the success of the Halo franchise.
*”Starting at $19.99 per week” per week refers to “Tanacra” Sofa Chaise (1460218): $19.99 a week for 85 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,699.15, GA/PA Cost of Lease Services: $700.15; VT- $19.99 a week for 95 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,889.60, Cash Price: $944.80, Rent-to-own Charge: $944.80; ME- $19.99 a week for 95 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,889.60, WV- $19.99 a week for 76 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,514.68, Retail Value/Cash Price: $631.12, Rent-to-own Charge: $883.56; CA- $19.99 a week for 81 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,615.59; NY- $19.99 a week for 92 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,828.17; HI- $19.99 a week for 76 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,511.68 and Augusta Mattress Eurotop 12" (M89931): $19.99 a week for 43 weeks, Total of All Payments: $859.57, GA/PA Cost of Lease Services: $360.57; WV- $19.99 a week for 43 weeks, Total of All Payments: $858.81, Retail Value/Cash Price: $357.84, Rent-to-own Charge: $500.97; VT- $19.99 a week for 54 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,071.40, Cash Price: $535.70, Rent-to-own Charge: $535.70; CA- $19.99 a week for 46 weeks, Total of All Payments: $916.04; NY- $19.99 a week for 52 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,036.57; ME- $19.99 a week for 54 weeks, Total of All Payments: $1,071.40. “Starting at $29.99 per week” refers to 65" UHD 4K ROKU TV (65S405): $29.99 a week for 80 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,399.20, GA/PA Cost of Lease Services: $1,000.20; WV- $29.99 a week for 87 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,594.59, Retail Value/Cash Price: $1,081.08, Rent-to-own Charge: $1,513.51; VT- $29.99 a week for 93 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,772.00, Cash Price: $1,386.00, Rent-to-own Charge: $1,386.00; CA- $29.99 a week for 89 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,650.72; NY- $29.99 a week for 104 weeks, Total of All Payments: $3,118.50; ME- $29.99 a week for 93 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,772.00; HI- $29.99 a week for 93 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,772.00 and 7 Piece Baystorm Bedroom Set (B221-7): $29.99 a week for 91 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,729.09, GA/PA Cost of Lease Services: $1,130.09; WV- $29.99 a week for 72 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,147.23, Retail Value/Cash Price: $894.68, Rent-to-own Charge: $1,252.55; VT- $29.99 a week for 90 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,678.70, Cash Price: $1,339.35, Rent-to-own Charge: $1,339.35; CA- $29.99 a week for 77 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,290.27; NY- $29.99 a week for 87 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,591.64; ME- $29.99 a week for 90 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,678.70; HI- $29.99 a week for 72 weeks, Total of All Payments: $2,142.96. Sample pricing based on models shown. Total cost may vary by items selected. Advertised rates begin 1/27/19 and end 2/23/19. Offers good while supplies last and cannot be combined with any other promotion. The “Total Price” does not include applicable taxes, optional fees and other charges (such as late charges) you may incur. Advertised rental rates and terms are for new merchandise at participating locations. Prices not valid outside U.S.
Emotes are depicted as characters in the Emotes tab. One character is a man in full white armour with a white medium helmet, another character is a man in a default outfit with brown hair, another character being a woman seemingly wearing a blue dwarf shirt and skirt, one is a jester (as in the Neitiznot jester outfit), Romeo, a cave goblin, a mime, a woman with a bronze platebody and a dragon plateskirt, a zombie, and a skillcape-wearer.
According to a recent report completed by the Entertainment Software Association in 2018, 64 percent of U.S. households own at least one gaming device, and 60 percent of Americans play video games daily. And though gamers are predominantly male, gamers of all ages and genders are present in the study. The report also shows that consumers spent $36 billion on the gaming industry in 2017, predominantly on content.
Emote icons that are bright in colour represent emotes that you have unlocked; either by default, or through the completion of a circumstance. On the other hand, dimmed out emote icons represent the emotes you have yet to unlock. Though the icon itself is obscured showing mostly the black frame, one can still hover over each locked emote to know its name.
When completing either the Mime or Gravedigger random event, players are rewarded the usual random event gift and would have the option to unlock an emote, along with either the typical costume piece or fixed number of resource rewards. Following an update on 24 October 2012, random events were removed all together and the emotes were temporarily discontinued until they were made complimentary with a purchased costume part from Iffie in Varrock on a later date.[1]

Emotes are depicted as characters in the Emotes tab. One character is a man in full white armour with a white medium helmet, another character is a man in a default outfit with brown hair, another character being a woman seemingly wearing a blue dwarf shirt and skirt, one is a jester (as in the Neitiznot jester outfit), Romeo, a cave goblin, a mime, a woman with a bronze platebody and a dragon plateskirt, a zombie, and a skillcape-wearer.

Born from a failed attempt to create a console with Nintendo, Sony's PlayStation would not only dominate its generation but become the first console to sell over 100 million units by expanding the video game market. Sony actively courted third parties and provided them with convenient c libraries to write their games. Sony had built the console from the start as a 3D, disc-based system, and emphasized its 3D graphics that would come to be viewed as the future of gaming. The PlayStation's CD technology won over several developers who had been releasing titles for Nintendo and Sega's fourth generation consoles, such as Konami, Namco, Capcom, and Square. CDs were far cheaper to manufacture and distribute than cartridges were, meaning developers could release larger batches of games at higher profit margins; Nintendo's console, on the other hand, used cartridges, unwittingly keeping third-party developers away. The PlayStation's internal architecture was simpler and more intuitive to program for, giving the console an edge over Sega's Saturn.


Although fully developed, functional, and with 2 games ready, the few Halcyon units that exist were handmade for investors of the company to try out the product, it is not believed that it ever went into full production or entered the market at all. Less than 12 Main Control Units (Halcyon 200LD, the console itself) are known to exist, but more Halcyon branded Laserdisc players (LD-700, made by Pioneer) exist.

During this time home computers gained greater prominence as a way of playing video games. The gaming console industry nonetheless continued to thrive alongside home computers, due to the advantages of much lower prices, easier portability, circuitry specifically dedicated towards gaming, the ability to be played on a television set (which PCs of the time could not do in most cases), and intensive first party software support from manufacturers who were essentially banking their entire future on their consoles.[29]


Home computers have long used magnetic storage devices. Both tape drives and floppy disk drives were common on early microcomputers. Their popularity is in large part because a tape drive or disk drive can write to any material it can read. However, magnetic media is volatile and can be more easily damaged than game cartridges or optical discs.[88] Among the first consoles to use magnetic media were the Bally Astrocade and APF-M1000, both of which could use cassette tapes through expansions. In Bally's case, this allowed the console to see new game development even after Bally dropped support for it. While magnetic media remained limited in use as a primary form of distribution, three popular subsequent consoles also had expansions available to allow them to use this format. The Starpath Supercharger can load Atari 2600 games from audio cassettes; Starpath used it to cheaply distribute their own games from 1982 to 1984 and today it is used by many programmers to test, distribute, and play homebrew software. The Disk System, a floppy disk-reading add-on to the Famicom (as the NES was known in Japan), was released by Nintendo in 1986 for the Japanese market. Nintendo sold the disks cheaply and sold vending machines where customers could have new games written to their disks up to 500 times.[89] In 1999, Nintendo released another Japan-only floppy disk add-on, the Nintendo 64DD, for the Nintendo 64.
Born from a failed attempt to create a console with Nintendo, Sony's PlayStation would not only dominate its generation but become the first console to sell over 100 million units by expanding the video game market. Sony actively courted third parties and provided them with convenient c libraries to write their games. Sony had built the console from the start as a 3D, disc-based system, and emphasized its 3D graphics that would come to be viewed as the future of gaming. The PlayStation's CD technology won over several developers who had been releasing titles for Nintendo and Sega's fourth generation consoles, such as Konami, Namco, Capcom, and Square. CDs were far cheaper to manufacture and distribute than cartridges were, meaning developers could release larger batches of games at higher profit margins; Nintendo's console, on the other hand, used cartridges, unwittingly keeping third-party developers away. The PlayStation's internal architecture was simpler and more intuitive to program for, giving the console an edge over Sega's Saturn.
In 1983, Nintendo released the Family Computer (or Famicom) in Japan. The Famicom supported high-resolution sprites, larger color palettes, and tiled backgrounds. This allowed Famicom games to be longer and have more detailed graphics. Nintendo began attempts to bring their Famicom to the U.S. after the video game market had crashed. In the U.S., video games were seen as a fad that had already passed. To distinguish its product from older game consoles, Nintendo released their Famicom as the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) which used a front-loading cartridge port similar to a VCR, included a plastic "robot" (R.O.B.), and was initially advertised as a toy. The NES was the highest selling console in the history of North America and revitalized the video game market. Mario of Super Mario Bros. became a global icon starting with his NES games. Nintendo took a somewhat unusual stance with third-party developers for its console. Nintendo contractually restricted third-party developers to three NES titles per year and forbade them from developing for other video game consoles. The practice ensured Nintendo's market dominance and prevented the flood of trash titles that had helped kill the Atari, but was ruled illegal late in the console's lifecycle.[23]
Wutface is the scared, confused face of esports broadcaster and Twitch employee Alex “Goldenboy” Mendez, and it signifies terror or confusion at whatever’s going on in the stream. There’s some overlap with the “wtf” implications of DansGame, but Wutface has a monopoly on the “bewildered” part of the surprise spectrum. You can use it whenever something just doesn’t make sense.
Since Twitch didn’t want to touch the emote because of legal concerns, according to Bain, he uploaded the photo to BTTV. BTTV, otherwise known as BetterTTV, is a third-party browser extension that allows people to use emotes in chat. Since these aren’t run through Twitch directly, the emotes often circumvent rules. This meant LUL could exist as an emote — a very, very popular emote — on Twitch despite the DMCA takedown. It only grew from there.
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