In 1983, the video game business suffered a much more severe crash. A flood of low-quality video games by smaller companies (especially for the 2600), industry leader Atari hyping games such as E.T and a 2600 version of Pac-Man that were poorly received, and a growing number of home computer users caused consumers and retailers to lose faith in video game consoles. Most video game companies filed for bankruptcy, or moved into other industries, abandoning their game consoles. A group of employees from Mattel Electronics formed the INTV Corporation and bought the rights for the Intellivision. INTV alone continued to manufacture the Intellivision in small quantities and release new Intellivision games until 1991. All other North American game consoles were discontinued by 1984. Revenues generated by the video game industry fell by 97% during the crash.


But just when you thought you’d learned emoji, now you’ve got a whole new symbolic meme language to master. On Twitch.tv, the internet’s primary hub for video game streaming and esports videos, there’s a parallel set of icons and a very specific vocabulary that goes with them. If you’re new to Twitch, you probably have no idea what a “PogChamp” or a “Kappa” are, or whose faces represent them, but they’re such an ingrained part of the culture. that popular broadcasters often say them out loud while livestreaming. And even though Twitter doesn’t support Twitch emotes, people steeped in the culture will spell them out in tweets, too.
It's almost impossible to watch a Twitch stream without encountering a quirky emote or two. Whether you spot a few of them used in the middle of a conversation in the Twitch stream's chat or catch a random flurry of images flying across the stream itself in an animated explosion of color and excitement, emotes are almost as much a part of the Twitch experience as the video games and streamers themselves and they're here to stay.
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Jebaited is the face of well-known fighting game tournament organizer Alex Jebailey, who’s infamous for his enormous ego. According to a comment on Reddit’s OutOfTheLoop, “His ego is so big that he was actually made into a character in the game Divekick, and his head grows in size every time he wins a round.” “Jebaited” is just a funnier way of saying “baited,” as in being tricked into falling for a trap or ruse. Players and viewers can both be “jebaited” in various ways.
A robot meme based on video game news publication Destructoid’s logo. The robot is mainly used when a glitch, error or computerized sound is made on stream. It’s also used, however, to poke fun at people’s robotic tendencies. It was used quite heavily during Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before congress that was livestreamed on Twitch by The Washington Post. Twitch chat would spam Mr. Destructroid whenever Zuckerberg said something or reacted to a question.
There’s a lot to break down to really understand gachiGASM. The term “gachimuchi” is a Japanese phrase that refers to muscular men who also have a fair amount of fat. This is how many people describe Billy Herrington, a former adult film star, who gained notoriety after one of his videos went viral on a site called Nico Nico Douga. gachiGASM is, well, based on a photo of Herrington’s face during orgasm. The emote is used to express a sense of deep pleasure over something that happens on screen, hence the “GASM” attached to the end of the emote name.

We do test them, of course. We’ve spent a lot of time playing video games on these consoles and even more thinking about what they can do. We make sure that everything we like about these products works and delivers like advertised. That includes playing all kinds of games, checking the quality of the internet connectivity, factoring in quality and quantity of exclusives, and checking if developers are currently making games for the platform.

The emote was introduced in 2015, but didn’t pick up steam until 2016 thanks to the speedrunning community. GamesDoneQuick, a semiannual charity event that brings together top speed runners, used the emote to express their discomfort if something cringe-worthy happened during the speedrun or on stream. The emote continued to grow, and was eventually banned by GDQ organizers because of the bullying connotation.
^ Tabuchi, Hiroko (March 23, 2010). "Nintendo to Make 3-D Version of Its DS Handheld Game". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved April 4, 2010. 'We wanted to give the gaming industry a head’s up about what to expect from Nintendo at E3,' said Ken Toyoda, chief spokesman at Nintendo. 'We'll invite people to play with the new device then.'
4head is pretty self-explanatory when it comes to visuals. It’s an emote based on a photo of League of Legends’ streamer Cadburry’s widely grinning face. The emote started to pick up in 2015. It’s a pretty wholesome meme, that is mostly used to express a reaction to a joke being made. The reaction can either be seen as an earnest response or sarcastic.
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