Sega's advertising positioned the Genesis as the cooler console,[47] and as its advertising evolved, the company coined the term "blast processing" (the origin of which is an obscure programming trick on the graphics hardware) to suggest that its processing capabilities were far greater than those of the SNES.[49][50] A Sony focus group found that teenage boys would not admit to owning a SNES rather than a Genesis.[51] With the Genesis often outselling the SNES at a ratio of 2:1,[52] Nintendo and Sega both focused heavily on impression management of the market, even going to the point of deception, with Nintendo claiming it had sold more consoles in 1991 than it actually had, and forecasting it would sell 6 million consoles by the end of 1992, while its actual U.S. install base at the end of 1992 was only just more than 4 million units.[53] Due to these tactics, it was difficult to ascertain a clear leader in market share for several years at a time, with Nintendo's dollar share of the U.S. 16-bit market dipping down from 60% at the end of 1992 to 37% at the end of 1993,[54] Sega claiming 55% of all 16-bit hardware sales during 1994,[55] and Donkey Kong Country helping the SNES to outsell the Genesis from 1995 through 1997.[46][56][57][58][59] According to a 2004 study of NPD sales data, the Sega Genesis was able to maintain its lead over the Super NES in the American 16-bit console market.[60] However, according to a 2014 Wedbush Securities report based on revised NPD sales data, the SNES outsold the Genesis in the U.S. market.[61]

Microsoft’s 4K juggernaut is the most powerful piece of console hardware on the market right now, beating out Sony’s PS4 Pro with a significant power advantage. Boasting a tasty six teraflops of computing power and 12GB of GDDR5 memory, the Xbox One X is capable of running even the most demanding of modern titles at 4K without sacrificing performance.


^ Damien McFerran. "Retroinspection: Mega-CD". Retro Gamer. Vol. 61. London, UK: Imagine Publishing. p. 84. During the run-up to the Western launch of Mega-CD ... [Former Sega of America technical director Scot Bayless] mentioned the fact that you could just 'blast data into the DACs'. [The PR guys] loved the word 'blast' and the next thing I knew 'Blast Processing' was born."
The first video games appeared in the 1960s.[20] They were played on massive computers connected to vector displays, not analog televisions. Ralph H. Baer conceived the idea of a home video game in 1951. In the late 1960s, while working for Sanders Associates, Baer created a series of video game console designs. One of these designs, which gained the nickname of the 1966 "Brown Box", featured changeable game modes and was demonstrated to several TV manufacturers, ultimately leading to an agreement between Sanders Associates and Magnavox.[21] In 1972, Magnavox released the Magnavox Odyssey, the first home video game console which could be connected to a TV set. Ralph Baer's initial design had called for a huge row of switches that would allow players to turn on and off certain components of the console (the Odyssey lacked a CPU) to create slightly different games like tennis, volleyball, hockey, and chase. Magnavox replaced the switch design with separate cartridges for each game. Although Baer had sketched up ideas for cartridges that could include new components for new games, the carts released by Magnavox all served the same function as the switches and allowed players to choose from the Odyssey's built-in games.
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