Emote is an example of what linguists call a back-formation - that is, a word formed by trimming down an existing word (in this case, "emotion"). From the time "emote" was coined in the early 20th century, its use has tended to be less than entirely serious. It most often appears in humorous or deprecating descriptions of the work of actors. It is similarly used to describe theatrical behavior by nonactors, as in this passage by David Fontana, published in The New Republic on March 11, 2012: "We might not want our president to emote about economics or war; but why shouldn't a fan, or for that matter a sports announcer, emote about athletics, which is not after all a matter of world historical importance?"

We use cookies to personalize contents and ads, offer social media features, and analyze access to our website. In your browser settings you can configure or disable this, respectively, and can delete any already placed cookies. For details, please see your browser’s Help section (by pressing F1). Please see our privacy statement for details about how we use data.


King’s Norse-themed strategy game didn’t have the smoothest launch, and its stingy economy reflects some of the worst pay-to-play trends of mobile gaming. Still, this match three tactics game has a novel gameplay concept that acts as a strong hook, and is so stuffed full of content than you can easily get an hour of satisfying action out of it every day without having to spend real money. With dozens of characters that have to be upgraded and over a half dozen basic modes to play, it’ll keep you tapping and sliding even when its flaws are a little too visible.
Mobile games contribute greatly to the high growth rate of mobile media use. On a global level, in 2016 the industry generated 35.6 billion U.S. dollars in revenue. The total figure was expected to grow to more than 40.6 billion by the end of 2017. Furthermore, it was calculated in 2016 that revenues of Google Play Store and Apple App Store from mobile games accounted for 90 and 80 percent of total revenues of these app stores respectively. As with all things gaming, data shows that Asia remains the largest region based on mobile games revenue as of 2016. Approximately three times smaller, North America was the second largest mobile gaming region, having generated 6.9 billion U.S. dollars that year. At end of 2016, there was an average of 2.8 billion monthly active users of mobile games worldwide, up from 2.7 billion in the last quarter of 2015.

The first handheld game console with interchangeable cartridges was the Microvision designed by Smith Engineering, and distributed and sold by Milton-Bradley in 1979. Crippled by a small, fragile LCD display and a very narrow selection of games, it was discontinued two years later. The Epoch Game Pocket Computer was released in Japan in 1984. The Game Pocket Computer featured an LCD screen with 75 X 64 resolution and could produce graphics at about the same level as early Atari 2600 games. The system sold very poorly, and as a result, only five games were made for it. Nintendo's Game & Watch series of dedicated game systems proved more successful. It helped to establish handheld gaming as popular and lasted until 1991. Many Game & Watch games were later re-released on Nintendo's subsequent handheld systems.


Games are frequently used to market a console and can do so either by exclusivity to a specific console or by using existing popular intellectual properties (IPs) that already have a strong following. Pac-Man for the Atari 2600 was already a well known arcade game and was expected to help the sales of 2600 devices[51] due to its popularity despite it being heavily criticized.[52]

Don't worry to much about learning curve because the game helps you learn the ropes as you play, but you'll soon figure out the best way to capture territory and go for the highest scores. You can play alone against the AI or against your friends. One of the best things about the game is you can play a single player game in under 30 minutes. Overall, the Battle of Polytopia is simply a great way to get your strategy gaming fix on mobile.
Xenowerk is a top-down, dual-stick shooter that has you blowing away mutants in the aftermath of a science experiment gone horribly wrong. You'll need to go deeper and deeper into multiple levels of an underground science facility as you shoot your way to objectives, grab new weapons and make your way to the exit. You also have a number of extra skills that do things like freeze your enemies to slow them down and heal yourself when the heat gets to be too much.
Finally we have one of the higher echelons of gaming mouse - the aptly titled Logitech MX 'Master'. It's 44 per cent off and costs £44.99. This bad boy has quite the range of features, such as freaky Darkfield laser tracking, meaning it works on virtually any surface with precise control - even glass is not impervious to its superior tracking capability! The Master's adaptive scroll wheel auto-shifts from click to click for what can only be described as "hyperfast" scrolling, plus its thumb wheel means you can scroll from side to side as well as top to bottom. In addition, it also only takes 4 minutes to charge, and that grants it up to 40 days of sweet, sweet playing juice. Curiously, it can also be paired up with three different devices, as it's both Bluetooth and unifying receiver compatible.
Console games receive commands from the player through the use of an input device, commonly called a controller. Unlike a PC which uses a keyboard and mouse or a mobile device that uses a touch interface, console games are limited in their control schemes by the hardware available for the console.[32] They usually include a method to move the player character (joystick, d-pad or analogue stick) and a variation of buttons to perform other in-game actions such as jumping or interacting with the game world.[33] The type of controller available to a game can fundamentally change the style of how a console game will or can be played.[34][35][36]

In Europe, downloadable mobile games were introduced by the "Les Games" portal from Orange France, run by In-fusio, in 2000. Whereas before mobile games were usually commissioned directly by handset manufacturers, now also mobile operators started to act as distributors of games. As the operators were not keen on handling potentially hundreds of relationships with one- or two-person developers, mobile aggregators and publishers started to act as a middleman between operators and developers that further reduced the revenue share seen by developers.[5]
×