Hear your opponents before they strike with a comfortable headset designed for serious gamers. The convenient in-line audio control saves you from navigating through menus while the durable aluminum frame withstands the damage of daily gaming. Stay fully immersed in your game thanks to 53mm drivers and enhanced bass reproduction that pump out crystal clear highs, mids and lows. Also features a closed cup design and detachable noise-cancelling mic.
The 16-bit era saw Nintendo at the peak of its creativity, releasing popular acclaimed games like The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and Super Metroid alongside cult hits like Earthbound. Third-party companies didn’t take a backseat, with Square Enix’ Final Fantasy VI and Konami’s Super Castlevania IV among the best games of the entire decade.

Sega scaled down and adapted their Sega System 16 (used to power arcade hits like Altered Beast and Shinobi) into the Mega Drive (sold as the Genesis in North America) and released it with a near arcade-perfect port of Altered Beast. Sega's console met lukewarm sales in Japan, but skyrocketed to first place in PAL markets, and made major inroads in North America. Propelled by its effective "Genesis does what Nintendon't" marketing campaign, Sega capitalized on the Genesis's technological superiority over the NES, faithful ports of popular arcade games, and competitive pricing. The arcade gaming company SNK developed the high end Neo Geo MVS arcade system which used interchangeable cartridges similar to home consoles. Building on the success of the MVS, SNK repackaged the NeoGeo as the Neo Geo AES home console. Though technologically superior to the other fourth-generation consoles, the AES and its games were prohibitively expensive, which kept sales low and prevented it from expanding outside its niche market and into serious competition with Nintendo and Sega. The AES did, however, amass a dedicated cult following, allowing it to see new releases into the 2000s. Fourth generation graphics chips allowed these consoles to reproduce the art styles that were becoming popular in arcades and on home computers. These games often featured lavish background scenery, huge characters, broader color palettes, and increased emphasis on dithering and texture. Games written specifically for the NES, like Megaman, Shatterhand, and Super Mario Bros. 3 were able to work cleverly within its limitations. Ports of the increasingly detailed arcade and home computer games came up with various solutions. For example, when Capcom released Strider in the arcade they created an entirely separate Strider game for the NES that only incorporated themes and characters from the arcade.
Create a custom controller experience that is uniquely yours. Designed primarily to meet the needs of gamers with limited mobility, the Xbox Adaptive Controller features large programmable buttons and connects to external switches, buttons, mounts, and joysticks to help make gaming more accessible. Requires external devices for gameplay (sold separately).*
First up, the dramatically titled Logitech 'Prodigy' gaming keyboard has been reduced by 42 per cent to £34.99 - the lowest it's ever been at the retailer, and the best price we've seen online. The exact same model will set you back £70 at Argos right now. Ideal for both performance gamers and folk who really enjoy bright colours, this keyboard boasts many advantages, such as a tactile, mechanical feel optimised to suit gaming, and an integrated rest for wrist strain. The Prodigy is also around four times faster than your average keyboard, and can be uniquely mapped with simple software.
With the advent of feature phones (contemporarily referred to as the 'camera phone') more hardware power became available even in bottom-of-the-range devices. Colour screens, multi-channel sound and most importantly the ability to download and store new applications (implemented in cross-industry standards such as J2ME and BREW) paved the way for commercial mobile game publishing. Some early companies utilized the camera phone technology for mobile games such as Namco and Panasonic. In 2003 Namco released a fighting game that used the cell phone's camera to create a character based on the player's profile and determined the character's speed and power based on the image taken; the character could then be sent to another friend's mobile phone to battle. That same year Panasonic released a virtual pet game in which the pet is fed by photos of foods taken with the camera phone.[6]
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