Video games have changed the way we tell stories – and with more and more possibilities to change a certain story in a game with an interactive narrative, where you as a player are faced with crucial decisions, more complex stories can be told. Games for Playstation, Xbox and PC give us the possibility to take risks that feel real without having the real world knock on the door with real world consequences. Part of what is so alluring about a first-person shooter game is that you as a player can shoot a heat-seeking missile at a building and see the results – without ending up in prison.

“The SEGA Mega Drive was my first console that I remember un-boxing then playing on for as long as I can remember – these consoles have brought those memories flooding back to me! They’re packed with the majority of my favourite games and the handheld has an SD card slot which is great for expanding your collection for those that are missing. The home console comes with 2 controllers (that’s right, you won’t be charged extra to play 2 player!) which is great for replaying all those classic multi-player games with a friend. The home console also has an original cartridge slot, so you can dust off all your old SEGA Mega Drive cartridges (or pick some up for cheap on eBay) and replay them in all their 16-bit glory!”
The world of tablets can be quite expensive. This is a great solution for people like me who don't want to commit to a tablet which costs hundreds of pounds. Build quality is great and feature are really good too. The Xbox controller is ace, it lets me play on my xbox whilst allowing my girlfriend to watch telly so we're both pleased! Totally recommend.
The Odyssey initially sold about 100,000 units,[22] making it moderately successful, and it was not until Atari's arcade game Pong popularized video games that the public began to take more notice of the emerging industry. By autumn 1975, Magnavox, bowing to the popularity of Pong, canceled the Odyssey and released a scaled-down version that played only Pong and hockey, the Odyssey 100. A second, "higher end" console, the Odyssey 200, was released with the 100 and added on-screen scoring, up to four players, and a third game—Smash. Almost simultaneously released with Atari's own home Pong console through Sears, these consoles jump-started the consumer market. All three of the new consoles used simpler designs than the original Odyssey did with no board game pieces or extra cartridges. In the years that followed, the market saw many companies rushing similar consoles to market. After General Instrument released their inexpensive microchips, each containing a complete console on a single chip, many small developers began releasing consoles that looked different externally, but internally were playing exactly the same games. Most of the consoles from this era were dedicated consoles playing only the games that came with the console. These video game consoles were often just called video games because there was little reason to distinguish the two yet. While a few companies like Atari, Magnavox, and newcomer Coleco pushed the envelope, the market became flooded with simple, similar video games.
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