“The SEGA Mega Drive was my first console that I remember un-boxing then playing on for as long as I can remember – these consoles have brought those memories flooding back to me! They’re packed with the majority of my favourite games and the handheld has an SD card slot which is great for expanding your collection for those that are missing. The home console comes with 2 controllers (that’s right, you won’t be charged extra to play 2 player!) which is great for replaying all those classic multi-player games with a friend. The home console also has an original cartridge slot, so you can dust off all your old SEGA Mega Drive cartridges (or pick some up for cheap on eBay) and replay them in all their 16-bit glory!”

With it, you can browse games in the Official PlayStation Store, which has access to over 500 titles for when you need something new to play. You’ll have access to cross-platform titles, indie games and re-releases from past consoles along with more exclusive titles than any other console on the market, including Uncharted, Spider-Man and Driveclub. Though the console is the largest on the market, its modern design makes it look slim. Plus, its matte black exterior helps it blend in with your other electronics. It ships with a 1TB hard drive, though you can opt to upgrade it to 2TB or plug in an external hard drive. Inside, you’ll find a 2.1GHz eight-core AMD Jaguar CPU and a 4.2 TFLOP AMD Radeon-based graphics card, which is paired with 8GB of GDDR5 RAM. The powerful system consistently maintains 1080p output and high frame rates. The updated DualShock 4 controller boasts Bluetooth connectivity and can charge via micro-USB so you aren’t permanently tethered to your console. The glowing light bar located along the front of each controller helps identify player one from player two, and even adds a little atmospheric lighting. New features on the controller include a capacitive touch pad, a 3.5mm audio jack, a built-in speaker and a dedicated screen capture button for saving screenshots and sharing them online.


The Xbox One and PS4 also offer access to old games, but in different ways. The Xbox One will let you put your old Xbox 360 games into the drive and play them (although only a selection of games are compatible). You can also play dozens of classic Xbox titles by buying a Game Pass subscription. The PS4 does not play old PS3 discs, but it offers a subscription service, called PlayStation Now, which lets you stream and play a huge selection of favourite PlayStation titles from yesteryear.

As a result of the Congressional hearings, Night Trap started to generate more sales and released ports to the PC, Sega 32X, and 3DO. According to Digital Pictures founder Tom Zito, "You know, I sold 50,000 units of Night Trap a week after those hearings."[85] Although experiencing increased sales, Sega decided to recall Night Trap and re-release it with revisions in 1994 due to the Congressional hearings.[89] After the close of these hearings, video game manufacturers came together to establish the rating system that Lieberman had called for. Initially, Sega proposed the universal adoption of its system, but after objections by Nintendo and others, Sega took a role in forming a new one. This became the Entertainment Software Rating Board, an independent organization that received praise from Lieberman.[85] With this new rating system in place, Nintendo decided its censorship policies were no longer needed, and the SNES port of Mortal Kombat II was released uncensored.[86]
Nintendo's GameCube was released in Japan on September 15, 2001, in North America on November 18, 2001, in Europe on May 3, 2002, and in Australia on May 17, 2002. It was Nintendo's fourth home video game console and the first console by the company to use optical media instead of cartridges. The GameCube did not play standard 12 cm DVDs, instead it employed smaller 8 cm optical discs. With the release of the GameCube Game Boy Player, all Game Boy, Game Boy Color, and Game Boy Advance cartridges could be played on the platform. The GameCube was discontinued in 2007 with the release of Wii.
When the 16bit Sega Mega Drive was first launched in the UK in 1990, it was an instant success, selling out on pre-sales alone. Hardly surprising considering its advanced graphics and gameplay, which had previously only been seen in the amusement arcades. The rival Super Nintendo was still two years away, so the Sony Mega Drive quickly became the dominant system, ultimately selling 30million units worldwide.

A. Yes. These games are ROMS and are mostly 99.9% the same as playing cartridges except for some minor details. Some graphics do not appear correctly at certain times in game play or the music may sound a bit off key then how you used to remember it. For example, in Golden Axe 3, when the female warrior casts her spells you hear fireballs falling from the sky but sometimes you don't see them. It is a hit and miss on some games. Others work perfectly fine. The only way you will experience the same game play you did 20 years ago is if you play off a cartridge.


You are bidding on a Sega Mega Drive 2 console with 12 game cartridges, all has been tried and tested and works and plays fine, you will receive 1 X console, 1 X PowerPack, 2 X official control pads, 1 X tv/RF lead, The games have also been tested and play fine they are, Mega BomberMan (case and instructions), Street Fighter 2 (case and instructions), Lemmings (case and instructions), Sylvester & Tweety in cagey capers (case and instructions), Tiny Toon adventures Busters hidden treasure (case no instructions), College Football (case and instructions), the next 6 games are just the cartridge, Sonic the hedgehog 1 2, Sonic & Knuckles, Altered Beast, Barkley shut up and Jam, Arnold Palmers Tournament Golf, Any questions please ask,


Sega began work on an enhancement chip to compete with the Super FX, resulting in the Sega Virtua Processor. This chip enables the Genesis to render polygons in real time and provides an "Axis Transformation" unit that handles scaling and rotation. Virtua Racing, the only game released with this chip, runs at a significantly higher and more stable frame rate than similar games on the SNES.[123] The chip was expensive to produce, and increased the cost of the games that used it. At US$100, Virtua Racing was the most expensive Genesis cartridge ever produced. Two other games, Virtua Fighter and Daytona USA, were planned for the SVP chip, but were instead moved into the Saturn's launch line-up.[123] There were plans to sell the SVP chip as a separate upgrade module for the Genesis,[124][125] but this module was never released.[123]

After the Genesis was discontinued, Majesco Entertainment released the Genesis 3 as a budget version in 1998.[150] In 2009, AtGames began producing two new variations: the Firecore, which can play original Genesis cartridges as well as preloaded games, and a handheld console preloaded with 20 Genesis games.[151] Companies such as Radica Games have released various compilations of Genesis and Mega Drive games in "plug-and-play" packages resembling the system's controller.[152]
Are there really people complaining about having to use RCA cables with this? Seeing as its a RETRO game from the early 90's, that is the only connection used because HDMI did not exist when this was made. And you can literally buy a HDMI-RCA adapter at any Radio Shack or electronic store for like 10 bucks. This is a great product! I was going to get the handheld one until I saw this one had 81 games instead of the 8 games the handheld had. Buy this, if you love retro, you will be in heaven.
With the Xbox One and Sony PlayStation 4; console gaming has entered a new level of visual fidelity and online play. Games on the Xbox One console and the PS4 console are bigger, more immersive and more graphically stunning than ever before. Now, with the PS4 Pro and the Xbox One X, you can enjoy even better graphics and processing power. Nintendo’s current console, the Switch, may not pack the same graphical punch, but has been enormously successful thanks to a stellar line up of games and the fact it can be used as a home console and a handheld.
The VES continued to be sold at a profit after 1977, and both Bally (with their Home Library Computer in 1977) and Magnavox (with the Odyssey² in 1978) brought their own programmable cartridge-based consoles to the market. However, it was not until Atari released a conversion of the golden age arcade hit Space Invaders in 1980 for the Atari 2600 that the home console industry took off. Many consumers bought an Atari console so they could play Space Invaders at home. The unprecedented success of Space Invaders started the trend of console manufacturers trying to get exclusive rights to arcade titles, and the trend of advertisements for game consoles claiming to bring the arcade experience home. Throughout the early 1980s, other companies released video game consoles of their own. Many of the video game systems (e.g. ColecoVision) were technically superior to the Atari 2600, and marketed as improvements over the Atari 2600. However, Atari dominated the console market in the early 1980s.
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