Sony led the charge on the mid-generation console update with the PS4 Pro but, by taking its time, Microsoft gave us the better hardware in the Xbox One X. It offers the same 4K Blu-ray and HDR video playback as the One S, while also bringing that visual enhancement to games. Microsoft wasn’t exaggerating when they told us that the Xbox One X is the most powerful home gaming console ever sold. It won’t be getting VR, however — which may disappoint those hoping it could be an inexpensive entry point to high-quality VR experiences.

Marking the largest jump in the technology of the gaming world since the move from arcades to home consoles, the Nintendo 64 was launched to critical acclaim thanks to the sheer innovation of introducing home gamers to the experience of 3-dimensional environments. Alongside the original PlayStation, this console helped usher in the modern era of video gaming as we know it, and it did so in excellent fashion. It also had the benefit of improving upon concepts introduced by its predecessor, the SNES – namely the Mario Kart and Starfox franchises. It’s also worth noting that, at the time of its release, Time Magazine named the N64 Machine of the Year.


And so, after a lot of rationalizing and budget-slicing, we ended up with a Founders Edition GeForce GTX 1070. Its $399 price means some concessions to storage and memory, but we felt it was worth making them. A graphics card is the main factor in the performance ceiling of a gaming machine, and going with a solid but not great option didn't sit right. This card also allows you to play at a higher resolution than 1080p with better frame rates (say, if you have a 1440p monitor). On the flip side, you might feel, understandably, that a GTX 1060 is plenty for this type of rig—and that choice gives you $100 to put toward other components. Our reviews at the link will give you an idea of the frame rates you will achieve with the different cards in different games.
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Even as Sony successfully marketed the slick and cool PlayStation 2 as a high-tech home media device, Nintendo tried to sell GCN as a simple games player for the whole family -- in hindsight, probably a mistake. GameCube looked like a lunchbox and, save for the fantastic Nintendo-published exclusives like Metroid Prime and Super Mario Sunshine -- it didn't really sport any distinguishing features over its competitors. The machine sold almost exclusively to Nintendo fans and younger gamers, which is why it was also largely shunned by third-parties, whose software usually performed better on other platforms. Nintendo ultimately sold about 22 million GameCube systems worldwide -- roughly 118 million units less than PlayStation 2.
"I was in line at Best Buy the morning the GameCube was released. The next few months was a glorious time, filled with Rogue Leader and Pikmin. I couldn't be bothered to buy a PS2 until a year later, and only then because it doubled as a DVD player. Those were the days when we actually got together to play games together in the same room, and the GameCube was simply the better console for that with titles like Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, Super Monkey Ball, and Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour."

Having decided which CPU we were going with, we knew the motherboard type we would need. You don't have to spend a bundle here—fitting the correct socket type for your processor is the chief concern—but nicer boards come with some nicer features. We went with the MSI B360-A Pro (using the LGA 1151 socket), which supports eighth-generation Intel chips like the Core i5-8400.
We then evaluated each console’s interface, looking for a smart layout that’s easy to use. We navigated through menus, adjusted the settings and compared ease of use. We approached this process twice over, first as gamers looking for quick access to new titles and already-installed games, and secondly as novice or non-gamer users looking for multimedia tools and apps. We found that the best consoles are the ones that make your favorite apps and games easy to access from a central place.
It did not help that NEC marched right into a perfect storm. The Turbo was released in August of 1989, just as the hype wars between the SEGA Genesis, the NES, and incoming Super NES were at a fever pitch. The pack-in game, Keith Courage in Alpha Zones, was an unknown compared to Altered Beast for the Genesis, which was a port of a popular arcade game that looked remarkably close to the coin-op version. Though the launch library had a couple of gems, like the pinballer Alien Crush, there was just no shaking the competition. The Turbo did not benefit from early realization that the machine was just straight-up underpowered compared to the Genesis. It didn't even have a second controller port; you needed to buy a peripheral so two people could play at the same time. It's no wonder the Turbo quickly fell to fourth place behind the NES, Super NES, and Genesis -- and stayed there.

Making your home theater into a gaming haven is not going to require much work. All you have to do is connect the gaming platform you select to the screen or projector and you can start gaming. Keeping in mind you have a screen and a decent sound system already in place. So kick your gaming experience up a notch by having your home theater serve as both a theater and a gaming room.
You need a good gamepad to play games, and both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have them. The Xbox One gamepad is a slightly updated version of the Xbox 360 controller, with a more rounded feel and trigger buttons that offer individual force feedback. The DualShock 4, the PS4's gamepad, is a completely overhauled controller that keeps the best parts of the DualShock 3 and fixes the worst. The analog sticks feel better, the triggers are more responsive, and the controller just feels nicer in the hand. It even features a built-in speaker and a potentially useful touchpad in the middle.
Gaming consoles are designed primarily for adults, as they can advertise mature games with scary or inappropriate content. Additionally, their interfaces can be rather utilitarian, making them hard for young children to use. Also, if you save your credit card information on the system for game purchases, it may be easy for your child to buy games without your permission. Some consoles have media streaming apps on them as well, making it easy for your kids to access shows or movies they shouldn’t view.

After spending a chunk of money on the screen you want to be sure you get the most out of it. You don’t want to position your seats too close to it or too far from it. There is actually science behind how far the seats should be from the screen. It mostly depends on the size of the screen. If you go with a screen that is 60” or more you need to have your seats at least 10’-11’ away from the screen. For every 5 inches you add to the screen, you can start your seat 6 inches further away. This will ensure you have the best view of the screen.


For digital downloads, each of the available storefronts work in similar ways. You download and install the software, create an account and attach necessary payment information, browse the catalog of games and make purchases. Any games you buy can subsequently be downloaded and installed. GOG is unique in that it allows for you to run games without DRM protection, meaning you don't have to be logged in to play games, nor do you need to have the GOG suite installed.
The Odyssey initially sold about 100,000 units,[22] making it moderately successful, and it was not until Atari's arcade game Pong popularized video games that the public began to take more notice of the emerging industry. By autumn 1975, Magnavox, bowing to the popularity of Pong, canceled the Odyssey and released a scaled-down version that played only Pong and hockey, the Odyssey 100. A second, "higher end" console, the Odyssey 200, was released with the 100 and added on-screen scoring, up to four players, and a third game—Smash. Almost simultaneously released with Atari's own home Pong console through Sears, these consoles jump-started the consumer market. All three of the new consoles used simpler designs than the original Odyssey did with no board game pieces or extra cartridges. In the years that followed, the market saw many companies rushing similar consoles to market. After General Instrument released their inexpensive microchips, each containing a complete console on a single chip, many small developers began releasing consoles that looked different externally, but internally were playing exactly the same games. Most of the consoles from this era were dedicated consoles playing only the games that came with the console. These video game consoles were often just called video games because there was little reason to distinguish the two yet. While a few companies like Atari, Magnavox, and newcomer Coleco pushed the envelope, the market became flooded with simple, similar video games.
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