It should also be noted that since we planned to film and photograph the process of building this system, we opted for some parts that are a bit flashier and more RGB-laden than strictly necessary. Below is a rundown of the components, including our thought process on why we went with them over other options. I won't go through all the possible alternatives, because there are an endless number, but this should lend some insight into our decision making. (Note: Prices are based on their cost at the start of September 2018.)
In conclusion, among the 20 best gaming setups we have lined up here. There are many choices to choose from, some are simple, some with grand lighting or some comprises the whole room and some has incredible CPUs. Most of these are not as friendly as a budget gaming setup but to make a mind-blowing setup, one has to put some effort and money into making it.
"While I still rail against Sony for some of the mistakes that it has made with its most powerful system to date, like removing backwards compatibility and stubbornly refusing to drop the price of the system, I still have fond memories of playing Metal Gear Solid 4 on the system multiple times over around the world, staying up all night long playing Warhawk with a core of dedicated players as the game launched and playing some incredible games of baseball with The Show over the past few years. Sure, it's hit some stumbling blocks, but the PS3 is one of those systems that has yet to showcase its true potential, and it'll be awesome to see what developers can squeeze out of the console in the years to come. "
The Xbox One X contains six trillion floating point operations per second with 326GB/s and 12GB GDDR5 RAM, giving it the most graphical horsepower in rendering native 4K HD graphics at 60 frames per second. This makes games like Call Of Duty: WWII have a heightened sense of realism, detailing everything from flowing hair, rays of the sun and clothing fiber. All Xbox One games are compatible and run better on the Xbox One X in Full HD display as well. Microsoft even plans on bringing Original Xbox and Xbox 360 backward compatibility to the system too.
The Gammaxx cooler wasn't our only unnecessary RGB accessory: We installed something even sillier. Lian Li provided us with its new Strimer RGB 24-Pin Cable, an auxiliary main-PSU power cable with colored lighting built in. It comes in two layers—the white cable itself, which carries the power, and a translucent layer of fiber-optic lighting that clips on to the top of the cable. (This latter layer is also connected to the cable by a small wire for power.) One end of the 24-pin cable gets plugged into the PSU's motherboard female power-cable socket on one end, and into the PSU's 24-pin male cable connector on the other.
If you really want to take the next step and become part of the game itself, enter the realm of virtual reality. Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR are two popular options that will put you in the centre of immersive, realistic game environments like you’ve never seen before. Explore vivid worlds as if you were really there, with full 360 degrees of freedom.

The Nintendo Switch has its own dedicated Capture button for grabbing screenshots and video clips, but it isn't as functional as the PlayStation 4's Share button. Not all games support capturing video at all, and there are no live streaming options. Annoyingly, to get any screenshots or video clips off of your Switch, you need to completely shut down the system and remove the microSD card, then put the card in a reader to transfer the files to your computer. Otherwise, you're limited to tweeting your screenshots or putting them on Facebook.
Juzel Albert Padilla has always been passionate about computers. Knowing how hard it is to find a solution for every computer problem, he aims to deliver the best solutions possible through his work on WePC.com. His passion to help and reach out to computer enthusiasts is what pushed him to deliver clear and concise contents. His writings focus on delivering informative tutorials and detailed how-to’s.

Fairchild released the Fairchild Video Entertainment System (VES) in 1976. While there had been previous game consoles that used cartridges, either the cartridges had no information and served the same function as flipping switches (the Odyssey) or the console itself was empty (Coleco Telstar) and the cartridge contained all of the game components. The VES, however, contained a programmable microprocessor so its cartridges only needed a single ROM chip to store microprocessor instructions. RCA and Atari soon released their own cartridge-based consoles, the RCA Studio II and the Atari 2600 (originally branded as the Atari Video Computer System), respectively.
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