You'd also be doing yourself an injustice as a gamer if you were to ignore Nintendo's 3DS and 2DS family of portable consoles as well, and under no circumstances should you completely rule out Sony's largely forgotten portable, the PlayStation Vita. All these handhelds now have sizeable libraries of games and, due to their age and current dominance by the Nintendo Switch, are going cheaper than ever before, making  them a savvy choice for gamers looking for big portable bang for their buck.
If you really want to take the next step and become part of the game itself, enter the realm of virtual reality. Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR are two popular options that will put you in the centre of immersive, realistic game environments like you’ve never seen before. Explore vivid worlds as if you were really there, with full 360 degrees of freedom.

The Switch is for people who really like Nintendo’s own games. Although other publishers do occasionally support the console (Switch can run Fortnite and Minecraft, for example) it’s the beautiful homegrown titles, such as Super Mario, Mario Kart and The Legend of Zelda, that most Switch owners are here for. Its online store is also packed with most of the best smaller independent games of the past few years.
During its life, the Jaguar managed to make a few cases for a purchase with a couple of solid efforts from id software, Rebellion, and psychedelic visual artist Jeff Minter. Atari's mismanagement of the hardware and company, its lack of internal development teams, its inability to secure key third-party developers, a disastrously terrible pack-in title called Cybermorph, and the fact that the Jaguar system was insanely difficult to program efficiently all played a part in the system's demise.
"Yeah, the PS2 is the system that helped land me a permanent job at IGN, but that's one of just many a fond memory of Sony's awesome console sequel. What really sticks out for me, though, was the huge buzz that the system had garnered in my neighborhood because it had Tekken Tag Tournament. Tekken Tag was THE game in our local arcades, and when a friend of mine convinced his girlfriend to buy him an import PS2 with Tekken Tag along with it, it was like having an extra Christmas. Our whole crew spent months learning techniques, brushing up on our skills and having an all around great time with our Tekken parties."
The Gammaxx cooler wasn't our only unnecessary RGB accessory: We installed something even sillier. Lian Li provided us with its new Strimer RGB 24-Pin Cable, an auxiliary main-PSU power cable with colored lighting built in. It comes in two layers—the white cable itself, which carries the power, and a translucent layer of fiber-optic lighting that clips on to the top of the cable. (This latter layer is also connected to the cable by a small wire for power.) One end of the 24-pin cable gets plugged into the PSU's motherboard female power-cable socket on one end, and into the PSU's 24-pin male cable connector on the other.
The following tables contain video game consoles and handheld game consoles that have sold at least 1 million units worldwide either through to consumers or inside retail channels. Each console include sales from every iteration unless otherwise noted. The years correspond to when the home or handheld game console was first released—excluding test markets. Each year links to the corresponding "year in video gaming".
NEC had a hit on its hands in Japan with the PC Engine in 1987, a console that regularly outsold the Famicom (the Japanese NES) and wanted to replicate that success in America. So it turned to a marketing company to repackage the underpowered 16-bit machine and go head-to-head with the dominant players in America: Nintendo and SEGA. Perhaps it was the lack of third-party support. Perhaps it was the absolutely goofy inter-capped name TurboGrafx-16. Whatever the culprit, the Turbo just never made a dent in the American market.
"The 2600 had a lot of fabulous games, and I remember playing River Raid so much that I had a callous between my thumb and index finger from the base of the not-too-ergonomic 2600 joystick rubbing on it. But I think the game we played the most was Maze Craze, which randomly generated a new maze every game and offered some great competitive multiplayer gameplay (for its time). That was perhaps the first "party game"—at least at our house."
Gaming PCs contain a higher end & more powerful graphics card as compared to traditional PCs. gaming laptops are also becoming more available as gaming grows increasingly more mobile. A large difference between a gaming laptop and a normal laptop is the cooling components. Gaming puts a heavy strain on both the GPU (graphics processing unit) and CPU (central processing unit) which generates more heat and therefore needs a more sophisticated cooling system.
From a slender elf to a trained macho assassin, many people spend a significant part of their life in a virtual world of computer games. Computer games are no longer the attribute of only nerds behind closed blinds but are played today by people of both genders and of all ages. Computer games can gather families for competitions in front of the flat screen and game enthusiasts from all over the world via the Internet, but they can also shield from strangers on the bus or from the complex world outside of the bedroom. Some are sceptic and anxious, while others cannot lower their arms from the excitement about the games’ learning potential.
Welcome to the eighth game console generation. The rise of 4K gaming. The remarkable arrival of the hybrid console-handheld. It's been several years since the Microsoft Xbox One and the Sony PlayStation 4 came out, with both systems getting more powerful variants partway through their life cycles. If that isn't enough, the newer Nintendo Switch has established itself as a retail powerhouse (even if it isn't a graphical powerhouse), with the ability to play connected to a TV like a home console or on the go like a handheld. Let's see how these systems compare against each other.
In the mid-1990s, various manufacturers shifted to optical media, specifically CD-ROM, for games. Although they were slower at loading game data than the cartridges available at that time, they were significantly cheaper to manufacture and had a larger capacity than the existing cartridge technology. NEC released the first CD-based gaming system, the TurboGrafx-CD (an add-on for the TurboGrafx-16), in December 4, 1988 in Japan and August 1, 1990 in the United States. Sega followed suit with the Sega CD (an add-on for the Sega Genesis) in Japan on December 12, 1991; Commodore stepped into the ring shortly after with the Amiga-CD32, the first 32-bit game console, on September 17, 1993. During the later half of the 1990s, optical media began to supplant cartridges due to their greater storage capacity and cheaper manufacturing costs, with the CD-based PlayStation significantly outpacing the cartridge-based Nintendo 64 in terms of sales. By the early 21st century, all of the major home consoles used optical media, usually DVD-ROM or similar discs, which are widely replacing CD-ROM for data storage. The PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One systems use even higher-capacity Blu-ray optical discs for games and movies, while the Xbox 360 formerly used HD DVDs in the form of an external USB player add-on for video playback before it was discontinued. However, Microsoft still supports those who bought the accessory. Nintendo's GameCube, Wii, and Wii U, meanwhile, use proprietary disc formats based on then-current industry standard discs—the GameCube's discs are based on mini-DVDs, the Wii's on DVDs and the Wii U's are believed to be based on Blu-rays. These discs offer somewhat smaller storage capacities compared to the formats they are based on, though the difference is significantly smaller compared to the gap between the N64's cartridges and CDs.
"Not since the launch of the Dreamcast had I been as excited to get a new console as I was when the Wii debuted. It looked fresh -- and fresh was definitely something I needed. (Let's face it, how many games have felt truly "new" since the original Jet Set Radio?) I still believe in the machine and think hardcore gamers don't give it the respect it deserves, partially due to loads of shovelware (that Nintendo should have pushed back against from Day One), but also partly because it's easy to poke fun of it. Waggle is for teh babys. Haha. Oh well. It's their loss because there truly are some magnificent videogames on the Wii."
"The N64 presented me with a key experience in my 30+ years of gaming that I will never forget – and will likely never experience again that same way. It was that first moment I stepped out into the 3D world of Super Mario 64 and just "played around" in the castle garden. I had played 3D games before Mario 64, but there was something different here; a unique feel and sense of complete freedom of movement that just seemed so "right." I knew that gaming had changed forever."
This list does not include other types of video game consoles such as handheld game consoles, which are usually of lower computational power than home consoles due to their smaller size, microconsoles, which are usually low-cost Android-based devices that rely on downloading, or dedicated consoles past the First Generation, which have games built in and do not use any form of physical media. Consoles have been redesigned from time to time to improve their market appeal. Redesigned models are not listed on their own.
Nintendo's Wii was released in North America on November 19, 2006, in Japan on December 2, 2006, in Australia on December 7, 2006, and in Europe on December 8, 2006. It is bundled with Wii Sports in all regions except for Japan. Unlike the other systems of the seventh generation, the Wii does not support an internal hard drive, but instead uses 512 MB of internal Flash memory and includes support for removable SD card storage. It also has a maximum resolution output of 480p, making it the only seventh generation console not able to output high-definition graphics. Along with its lower price, the Wii is notable for its unique controller, the Wii Remote, which resembles a TV remote. The system uses a "sensor bar" that emits infrared light that is detected by an infrared camera in the Wii Remote to determine orientation relative to the source of the light. All models, other than the Wii Family Edition and the Wii Mini, are backwards compatible with GameCube games and support up to four GameCube controllers and two memory cards. It also includes the Virtual Console, which allows the purchase and downloading of games from older systems, including those of former competitors. In 2009, Nintendo introduced the 'Wii MotionPlus' expansion, which uses the same technology as the console previously used, but with enhanced motion tracking and sensing to improve gameplay quality.
However, there are many more and better gaming setups you can find on the internet but these 20 we have lined up as best gaming setups while considering variations, colour and texture, elegance etc. As not everyone likes a multi-monitor gaming, we have put few setups with one or two monitors or a setup with multiple monitors but only one dedicated to gaming. All in all, keeping many aspects of gaming in mind these are one of the 20 best gaming setups we have lined up this month.

"It's hard to narrow down my fondest PS3 memory -- namely because I'm still making them. I guess through all the SingStar parties at my apartment, getting my first Platinum Trophy, and getting goose bumps while watching the E3 2009 Uncharted 2: Among Thieves demo, my favorite memory is when I was lugging my PS3 back into work, my IGN bag broke, and the system tumbled to the concrete. Other than a dinged corner, the system was still in tip-top shape. An Xbox 360 would've shattered like the T-1000 in Terminator 2." 

The future begins on the world's most powerful console. Own the Xbox One X Fallout 76 Bundle, which includes a full-game download of Fallout 76, the prequel to the award-winning RPG series from Bethesda Game Studios. Explore, quest, build, and triumph in a vibrant, post-nuclear wasteland. Xbox Live Gold is required to play the game (is sold separately, one month is included).

The third major handheld of the fourth generation was the Game Gear. It featured graphics capabilities roughly comparable to the Master System (better colours, but lower resolution), a ready made games library by using the "Master-Gear" adapter to play cartridges from the older console, and the opportunity to be converted into a portable TV using a cheap tuner adaptor, but it also suffered some of the same shortcomings as the Lynx. While it sold more than twenty times as many units as the Lynx, its bulky design - slightly larger than even the original Game Boy; relatively poor battery life - only a little better than the Lynx; and later arrival in the marketplace - competing for sales amongst the remaining buyers who didn't already have a Game Boy - hampered its overall popularity despite being more closely competitive to the Nintendo in terms of price and breadth of software library.[28] Sega eventually retired the Game Gear in 1997, a year before Nintendo released the first examples of the Game Boy Color, to focus on the Nomad and non-portable console products. Other handheld consoles released during the fourth generation included the TurboExpress, a handheld version of the TurboGrafx-16 released by NEC in 1990, and the Game Boy Pocket, an improved model of the Game Boy released about two years before the debut of the Game Boy Color. While the TurboExpress was another early pioneer of color handheld gaming technology and had the added benefit of using the same game cartridges or 'HuCards' as the TurboGrafx16, it had even worse battery life than the Lynx and Game Gear - about three hours on six contemporary AA batteries - selling only 1.5 million units.[27]
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