This is a list of home video game consoles in chronological order, which includes the very first home video game consoles ever created, such as first generation Pong consoles, from the first ever cartridge console Odyssey, ranging from the major video game companies such as Magnavox, Atari, Nintendo, Sega, NEC, 3DO, SNK, Sony, Microsoft to secondary market consoles.
"The Dreamcast launch was a huge deal for me. In fact, the day before the launch, this really amazing girl came into my work and asked me out. And we were on a date that was going so well, but I kept looking at my watch thinking, "I have to get ready for the DC launch." Yeah, I chose the Dreamcast over hooking up with a hot girl and I'd do it again."

The second contribution, Xbox Live, proved a testbed for the version that's become so beloved on Xbox 360. Though the SEGA Dreamcast had broadband gameplay, Xbox's Live service was the first that managed to capture a high level of quality among a large number of games. It gave us the first iteration of a Friends List and even had a few Xbox Live Arcade titles. The service kicked off with MechAssault and continues on through Halo 2, a game which is still played online by hundreds of thousands of gamers. With Live, the Xbox showed us the future of console gaming.
It should also be noted that since we planned to film and photograph the process of building this system, we opted for some parts that are a bit flashier and more RGB-laden than strictly necessary. Below is a rundown of the components, including our thought process on why we went with them over other options. I won't go through all the possible alternatives, because there are an endless number, but this should lend some insight into our decision making. (Note: Prices are based on their cost at the start of September 2018.)

Probably the best example of a system that was marred by bad timing, the Dreamcast should, from a technological standpoint, go down as one of Sega’s crowning achievements. Unfortunately, after a largely successful release, the console was eclipsed by news of the upcoming release of the PlayStation 2. Regardless, the Dreamcast was a wonderful gaming machine and afforded many the opportunity to play some of the most immersive and stylized games of their time – including a port of the extremely popular arcade game, Crazy Taxi. Though it was another step in Sega’s inevitable downfall, the Dreamcast was a much better console than for which it was given credit.
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Design your own creative Mario levels with this Nintendo 2DS Super Mario Maker bundle. The handheld console plays both Nintendo DS and 3DS games in clear 2D graphics, and its wireless capabilities let you connect friends and other players. Collaborate with friends on game courses with the creative tools and design tutorials of this Nintendo 2DS Super Mario Maker bundle.
The newest heavy-duty console to hit the market – the Xbox One X – has 4K HDR playback and the most powerful gaming console processor on the market. The Xbox One S and PlayStation 4 Pro also have some 4K and/or HDR playback abilities, though to a lesser degree than the One X. Any of these is a smart choice if you have a compatible TV and access to 4K games and video, and they can make for the perfect binge session of Netflix’s latest 4K content.

The Switch also has the advantage of third-party controllers. The PS4 and Xbox One are very dedicated to their first-party gamepads, with only a few third-party wired options available unless you want to shell out a significant amount of money for a SCUF or Evil Controllers product. The Switch features the first-party option of the excellent Switch Pro Controller, which feels very similar to the Xbox One wireless controller, and works with third-party gamepads from 8Bitdo and Hori. The ability to switch out your Joy-Cons for an 8Bitdo SN30 Pro or Switch Pro Controller is a huge boon, along with the sheer flexibility afforded by the Joy-Cons themselves.
First up, there is a Dualshock 4, that you probably know of. Because if you know at least something about PS4 controllers, that one will presumably be the one you know, since it is in many ways a standard. And it is also the main controller. As it can be assumed, it is called 4, because it is the fourth PS controller in the range. The third one, that came just before, shares a common feature with the fourth. It is connected to the console via Bluetooth, which is gradually becoming a technology used in many different areas. Though there is a significant difference between the two models that you surely cannot forget and that is, the number 3 does not fit PS4, so if you have an earlier version of a controller and a newer console, you cannot use them together, since they are not compatible.
Game cartridges consist of a printed circuit board housed inside of a plastic casing, with a connector allowing the device to interface with the console. The circuit board can contain a wide variety of components. All cartridge games contain at the minimum, read only memory with the software written on it. Many cartridges also carry components that increase the original console's power, such as extra RAM or a coprocessor. Components can also be added to extend the original hardware's functionality[81] (such as gyroscopes, rumble packs, tilt-sensors, light sensors, etc.); this is more common on handheld consoles where the user does not interact with the game through a separate video game controller.[82] Cartridges were the first external media to be used with home consoles and remained the most common until continued improvements in capacity in 1995 (the Nintendo 64, released in 1996, was the last mainstream game console to use cartridges).[83] Nevertheless, the relatively high manufacturing costs and limited data capacity compared to optical media at the time saw them completely replaced by the latter for home consoles by the early 21st century, although they are still in use in some handheld video game consoles and in the Nintendo Switch. Due to the aforementioned capabilities of cartridges such as more memory and coprocessors, those factors make it harder to reverse engineer consoles to be used on emulators.
"I never owned a TurboGrafx and never wanted one, but I do remember one of my co-workers' eyes lighting up when he was describing to me Bonk's Adventure after he went and saw it at a retailer's show. His animated description was enough for me to get excited along with him, and when it eventually came out I was right there with him all jazzed about this crazy prehistoric platformer."
"The fact that it was the Neo-Geo's King of Fighters games that allowed me to bond with my female acquaintance-turned girlfriend-turned wife sticks out most in mind. While most folks in the crowd of gamers we were hanging around with were stringent Street Fighter players who didn't care one iota about KOF, my interest in the SNK series and the girl playing it went hand in hand. Our constant matches against one another allowed us to talk for hours, which led to us getting to know each other better before eventually falling in love. Sure, there were a lot of other contributing factors that led to our relationship becoming what it did, but it was KOF that was the ice breaker, and that's pretty awesome."
"I remember getting the dreadful 2600 version of Donkey Kong for Christmas and seeing the god awful Intellivision edition at my friends place. And then I saw the game come out as a pack-in for the Colecovision. Even when I was 10 I knew there was shenanigans at play – clearly Coleco intentionally sabotaged the other versions to make sure that Coleco's own console version was the one everyone wanted. It worked: I really, really wanted a Colecovision after playing its version of Donkey Kong at a toy store. "
The library of original titles introduced on the PlayStation can read like a history lesson in videogames. The likes of Metal Gear Solid, Gran Turismo, Resident Evil, Tony Hawk and much, much more were seen here for the first time, and these franchises continue to be some of the biggest in all of gaming. Were it not for the PlayStation, a number of genres that we take for granted these days may never have come to fruition, or at least been popularized so well.
First up, there is a Dualshock 4, that you probably know of. Because if you know at least something about PS4 controllers, that one will presumably be the one you know, since it is in many ways a standard. And it is also the main controller. As it can be assumed, it is called 4, because it is the fourth PS controller in the range. The third one, that came just before, shares a common feature with the fourth. It is connected to the console via Bluetooth, which is gradually becoming a technology used in many different areas. Though there is a significant difference between the two models that you surely cannot forget and that is, the number 3 does not fit PS4, so if you have an earlier version of a controller and a newer console, you cannot use them together, since they are not compatible.
Compatibility - If you’ve previously owned a gaming console, you should consider buying a new console that’s compatible with the library of games you’ve likely collected. For example, your PS4 won’t play games from older Sony consoles, but you can still access hundreds of older PlayStation titles using the PS Now streaming service. Xbox One, on the other hand, has much better backwards compatibility, not to mention a digital redemption scheme that lets you download newer versions of your existing games for free.

"After mastering Pitfall II on my Atari 2600, a friend of mine invited me over to his house to help him get through the 5200 version of the game – it was a spot-on conversion, so all my skills carried over. But where the 2600 version ended, the 5200 edition continued on with Pitfall Harry wandering into a new cave with harder enemies and a new area to explore. Unfortunately, after about two minutes in the new area my friend had to bolt for dinner...and then he moved away the next week. So I never got a chance to play that extra part of Pitfall II." 

This was a tricky one. We originally budgeted for an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060—a modest but effective HD gaming card. Most of the time with that card, in most games, you get at least 60 frames per second (fps) in 1,920 by 1,080 gameplay with settings at or near maximum. But it's not a powerhouse. The GeForce GTX 1060 Founders Edition retails for $299, so from the start we were picking the rest of the components with a GTX 1060 at that price in mind. As the process went on, though, we were tempted by the more powerful GeForce GTX 1070. Something about going through all of the trouble to build a gaming-specific machine only to use a GTX 1060 just felt underwhelming.
"By the time the Atari 7800 launched, it looked like old news to me. I was hooked on my Commodore 64 and the NES was exploding. However, all that changed when the 7800 became the only place to play one of my all-time favorite arcade games: Food Fight. Then I suddenly coveted the console. It became my "Food Fight machine" that also happened to play pretty good ports of Joust, Dig Dug, Donkey Kong, and Xevious."
The only thing that we didn’t like about the setup are the 2 ultrawide monitors. Gaming with only 2 monitors is just inconvenient because of the bezels. Moreover, there are some issues with having only ultrawide monitors (which we have discussed in some of the above builds that feature ultrawide monitors). One Ultrawide is great, but we wouldn’t be opposed to swapping it out for 2 smaller 16:9 monitors. Of course, this might increase the overall build cost unless you’re going for 1080p monitors.
The first line of eighth-generation-compatible boards (boards based on the Z370 chipset) cost over $100; these less expensive B360 models are relatively new. This model comes with a solid port selection and plated heatsinks that don't get in the way of installation, and it fits the black-and-white color scheme. The two main concessions for the B360 boards' lower prices are that you can't overclock CPUs installed in them, and that they support only one video card. That syncs up perfectly with the plan for this particular build, so we were happy to save the money. It's relatively straightforward but effective, and at $79 with a $10 rebate, this motherboard definitely doesn't break the bank.
Some high-end enthusiasts may insist on a Core i7, but you truly don't need one for gaming, as most games don't stress the Hyper-Threading function that makes Core i7 models so appealing for other CPU-intensive tasks. Even a Core i3 would suffice for most builders, but since it's the heart of the system for gaming and also for everyday tasks, we figured we'd be grateful for the extra juice. Note that this isn't one of Intel's "K" series processors, meaning it is not unlocked for overclocking, which is fine; doing so is unnecessary most of the time for gaming. It also lets us save money on other components, such as the next one.
Will Greenwald has been covering consumer technology for a decade, and has served on the editorial staffs of CNET.com, Sound & Vision, and Maximum PC. His work and analysis has been seen in GamePro, Tested.com, Geek.com, and several other publications. He currently covers consumer electronics in the PC Labs as the in-house home entertainment expert... See Full Bio
NEC brought the first fourth-generation console to market with their PC Engine (or TurboGrafx16) when Hudson Soft approached them with an advanced graphics chip. Hudson had previously approached Nintendo, only to be rebuffed by a company still raking in the profits of the NES. The TurboGrafx used the unusual HuCard format to store games. The small size of these proprietary cards allowed NEC to re-release the console as a handheld game console. The PC Engine enjoyed brisk sales in Japan, but its North American counterpart, the TurboGrafx, lagged behind the competition. The console never saw an official release in Europe, but clones and North American imports were available in some markets starting in 1990. NEC advertised their console as "16-bit" to highlight its advances over the NES. This started the trend of all subsequent fourth generations consoles being advertised as 16 bit. Many people still refer to this generation as the 16-bit generation and often refer to the third generation as "8-bit".
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