This is no longer the case as titles are now available across platforms; and in nearly all cases, the PC title is better than its console counterpart. Why? Because most computers are simply more capable than consoles. Take for example the Sony PlayStation® 4; with a processor speed of 1.6GHz and 8GB of RAM, is bested even by some entry-level laptops. Thus, in the ongoing debate that is console vs. PC gaming, many gamers are starting to ask themselves why they should show allegiance to any one console when their gaming PC can support all of the titles that interest them – while also providing all of the benefits of a computer.
This isn’t because of goodwill towards PC gamers, of course. Prices trend low because there’s a ton of competition. More games come to PC in most genres, and entire genres that don’t appear on console. MOBAs, the world’s most popular game genre, is almost entirely missing on console. On PC, there’s plenty to choose from. The same can be said of real-time and turn-based strategy, massively multiplayer games, hardcore racing simulators.
Making your home theater into a gaming haven is not going to require much work. All you have to do is connect the gaming platform you select to the screen or projector and you can start gaming. Keeping in mind you have a screen and a decent sound system already in place. So kick your gaming experience up a notch by having your home theater serve as both a theater and a gaming room.

If you wanted a Playstation 4, you would’ve bought one, right? You’re probably reading this guide because you know that consoles severely lack customizability, and they’re also not powerful enough to play the latest games smoothly at maximum detail, and modding games on them is considerably harder when it's even possible, and you're completely limited to the exclusives of that particular console family (and often also that console generation), and . . . well, you get the idea.


With everything else selected, we were able to get a sense of how much power we'd need to run the system. The GPU and CPU are the main power drains, and given the components we selected, the 650W Corsair VS Series VS650 is strong enough for the job. 450 to 500 watts is enough for a GTX 1070 and the relevant components, so the VS650 even leaves some headroom to be safe. It's not one of the fancier options—it's non-modular, without the higher-end gold or platinum certification—but in a build that doesn't require excessive power and is trying to stay under a price limit, it should be a fine fit.
When it comes to online gaming, PCs give people a variety of ways to connect to the internet and to one another that aren't restricted to proprietary services or software. Different brands of computers and operating systems usually communicate well with one another. This is different from services like Xbox Live, for example, which is the only option available to Xbox users who want to play online and is closed to everyone who doesn't have an Xbox.
The PC is the way to go for true gaming (sorry console gamers). They have been ahead of consoles for a long time. Their performance is unparalleled compared to any other gaming machine and is constantly getting better. To get the latest and greatest in a PC will set you back a lot of money. But you don't need to have the best to play the best. The beauty about PC gaming is the variability of it. You can get a very decent gaming PC built for around $800. If you just want a PC to do as good as a console, you can make it for less than a console. PC's price point and power makes it a must for all gamers and their gaming setup. We made a great guide on what to consider when buying or building your own PC.
Ghosting can really get in the way of intense gaming or hard work so Anti-Ghosting can be a key feature of a great gaming keyboard. Ghosting occurs when multiple keys are pressed simultaneously but not all are registered, those missed are said to have been ‘ghosted’. Anti-Ghosting supports simultaneous keystrokes so your moves are never missed in the game.
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