When it comes to deciding on a graphics card, it's all about personal preference and determining what you place the most value on. Do you want a graphics card specifically for 4K gaming, or for 1080p gaming, or do you simply want the best card on the market, money regardless? There really is no wrong answer after a certain point, so long as you have the cash to spend and a monitor that can do justice to the card.

Unless you have spare parts at your disposal, you need to consider seven core components when putting together a build: a case, a motherboard, a power supply, a CPU, a graphics card (or two), some­­ RAM, and storage. And you'll see almost infinite options out there for each of these. Factor in cost, function, personal manufacturer preferences, and aesthetics, and you have a lot of decisions to make! Given our $1,000 cap, we had to decide which of these were the most important to the concept of an HD gaming machine, and which we could live with compromising on.
If you want the ultimate gaming experience we recommend going with a PC that is dedicated to gaming. These systems are specifically designed for gamers and can handle the toughest of games with ease. They have a fast processor system and a state of the art dedicated graphics card with 4K resolution capabilities that will enhance your gaming experience. Not only that, these computers come with the latest technology so that when you play online there is limited to no lag or loss of connection with your Wi-Fi. Do consider that lag and load time also depends on your internet speed. So whether you decide to get an Alienware or an Acer Predator, you are sure to have a wonderful gaming experience.
3. PC gaming library is massive. You can play games from around 1980 up till now (some even free), and even the grey area of PC gaming like emulations (PSX, PS2, Nintendo, SNES, SEGA, Arcade, android, etc) that will open up a lot of those exclusive AAA titles... Oh and exclusivity is just a bait for you to buy into their wares, and it is generally a bad thing for consumer because it divide who can and can't play.
Anyone who's a gamer knows that for as long as there has been a divide between console gaming and PC gaming, there has been a debate on which is better. The console gamers have often argued that by virtue of their devices being dedicated gaming machines, consoles were better suited for gaming. PC gamers would counter-argue that PC machines have far more computing power than their console counterparts, and thus are for true gamers. The debate is only further muddied by the fact that many of today's consoles are now designed as do-everything machines. They can just as easily be used to watch Netflix or Hulu as they can be used for gaming. Which begs the question: If consoles are starting to emulate computers, what do they offer the modern gamer?
This is a pretty modest gaming machine, taking advantage of relatively impressive integrated graphics performance on its CPU. It will be able to run a majority of games on SteamOS, and it should run many graphically intense games on medium settings. The pricing on this machine makes it financially competitive with the current generation of consoles.

Tonight I could pop open Steam and play Street Fighter V. I could also play Gears of War 4, Forza Motorsport 7, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Axiom Verge, Talos Principle, Killing Floor 2, Darkest Dungeon, No Man’s Sky, Downwell, SOMA, Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture, Transistor, Grow Home, Hotline Miami 2, N++, Volume, and so many others. The video below is of Tekken 7 running at 4K resolution on a PC, and Final Fantasy XV is coming to computers in 2018.


And then you must deal with the bugs. Console fans often overstate the problems found on PC, and modern game consoles aren’t immune to crashing, but it remains true that bugs are more common on a computer than a game console. We aren’t just talking about hard crashes, which are rare. Instead, it’s the small stuff that becomes an issue. A game might fail to load properly because it wasn’t run in administrator mode, the Wi-Fi adapter might occasionally lose connection, or a USB port might go on the fritz.
Nvida's crazy streaming device. Some say this range of devices inspired the Nintendo Switch, yet this model is just a very hardcore and high-end streaming device for all kinds of media, from games to films to everything else. In addition to being designed for a broader range of streaming applications than the Steam Link, this beast also comes equipped with 'smart' capabilities, including Roku-style all-in-one video streaming management and smart home device compatibility.

This doesn’t mean a Ryzen/Vega chip will perform as well as GeForce 1060. It does mean that you will be able to play decent games on a budget while you save up for a good graphics card, if you find you need one. That’s the great thing about desktop PCs: you can add more memory, bigger drives and faster graphics cards for many years after you have bought them.

Gaming PC Bundle. Two LG monitors, choice of keyboards and mice depending on price. Could even include a microphone/headset. The specs are i5, 8GB RAM, GTX 780, 600W PSU, 60GB SSD, 750GB HDD and Novatech case with DVD Rewriter. Good used condition, everything works and it runs quietly but the case doesn't look the best. Included is all the cables so has everything you need to start using it straight away. Collection in person only. Advertised elsewhere. Any questions give me a text or call as I can't always answer via eBay. 07582627557
The case we chose is a big part of keeping things simple, as it's fairly roomy, without many restrictive design flourishes. Removing the tempered-glass panels through hand screws was easy, and from there, we had plenty of room to work. There was a moment of hesitation about how to install the power supply unit (PSU)—a white shroud covers its install location—but it was simple enough to remove the other side's glass side panel and slot it in that way.
Coming to an insurmountable obstacle in the middle of a live video because of a missing, incompatible, or broken component is the ultimate nightmare—thankfully, that hasn't happened to us yet!. But it's fun to take live questions through Facebook, talk to viewers, and make our build as watchable as possible while we work on it at a reasonable pace. In my experience, it's been an entertaining challenge—as long as we don't make any glaring errors! If we do, we can count on our viewers to let us know. Right away.

Executive Editor John Burek and I build a lot of PCs together. For this project, we settled on a simple goal: putting together an uber-attractive gaming rig with a $1,000 price cap for reliable gaming at 1080p or 1440p. (The overall pricing is fluid; allow us a little wiggle room for sales, rebates, and ever-changing parts costs.) We settled on one of today's strongest possible component loadouts at about a grand, for a PC that combines plenty of gaming grunt and practically out-of-control RGB lighting—with a couple of inexpensive extras that will really take it over the top.


Similar to the G900 Chaos Spectrum, the G402 Hyperion Fury is another high-speed mouse and one of our favorite picks as the best gaming gear out there. This mouse contains optical sensor technology and combines it with Logitech’s custom built Fusion Engine hybrid sensor that will track speeds up to 500 IPS. Though this high-tech mouse is great for gaming, it is often highly regarded as a multi-use product. The Hyperion Fury is getting high praise for its built-in accelerometer and gyro which augments the capabilities of the optical sensor. If the optical sensor fails to produce due to the mouse’s high speed, this feature allows the mouse to make up time just in case.
All of our Steam machine and other living room PC build recommendations below use Mini-ITX cases and components, meaning the machines will be much more compact and portable than your average computer. The cases, motherboards, and sometimes power supplies are smaller than you will find with a normal desktop PC. Some of these components are more expensive in smaller sizes, while others may be a little cheaper.
In the battle of console vs. PC, many gamers are starting to migrate away from consoles to gaming laptops and desktops. The reasons for this are many. The side that people chose in the PC vs. console gaming debate used to be dictated in part by the game titles that most interested them. In the market's infancy, many titles were exclusively offered on one platform or the other – not both.
This isn’t because of goodwill towards PC gamers, of course. Prices trend low because there’s a ton of competition. More games come to PC in most genres, and entire genres that don’t appear on console. MOBAs, the world’s most popular game genre, is almost entirely missing on console. On PC, there’s plenty to choose from. The same can be said of real-time and turn-based strategy, massively multiplayer games, hardcore racing simulators.
Ghosting can really get in the way of intense gaming or hard work so Anti-Ghosting can be a key feature of a great gaming keyboard. Ghosting occurs when multiple keys are pressed simultaneously but not all are registered, those missed are said to have been ‘ghosted’. Anti-Ghosting supports simultaneous keystrokes so your moves are never missed in the game.
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