Logitech’s goal while creating this mouse was essentially to replicate more than enough movement and speed of the gamers arm, making it a mouse that is able to keep up with those short burst arm movements without causing a delay in speed. With this mouse, the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury allows you take your gaming capabilities to the next level. We recommend this one if the previous mouse was a bit too expensive for your budget and you wanted to upgrade yet save a little more cash at the same time.
This case's big, tempered-glass windows on four sides will highlight the components, and it includes eye-catching fan lighting on the front. It made things more fun, and it also saved us from having to install our own lighting during a live build. (The fans and their lighting come pre-wired.) It also looked relatively easily to build in, and who doesn't want that? At $127 at this writing, this chassis is certainly pricier than necessary—if you're cutting it close, you can easily shave money off with a less expensive case. But it looks great.
The gaming console you choose will be the brain of your entire gaming system. The graphics, load time, and overall gaming experience all depend on the capabilities of your console. So you want a console that is top of the line and will match the capabilities of your home theater. This is also where you decide whether you want to go with separate consoles or get a gaming PC.
When talking about desktop computers, there are three operating systems that one can run on: Windows, Linux, and macOS. Windows is the most popular by far and when we talk about “PC gaming”, your thoughts are most likely to go to a Windows desktop. Plenty of games have been released for Linux and macOS as well, although the limited selection makes Windows the only real choice.
You have two basic options here, as with any other internet connectivity: wired or wireless (wi-fi). Being even half a second out of sync with others while playing can ruin a game, so it's important to minimise lag. A wired connection helps to keep speeds higher and lag to a minimum, more so than connecting via wi-fi. If you want to test your internet speed, there are many online tools to help you do so.
A PC is the gaming solution for a massive number of people in today's world, and a living room gaming PC is a way of bringing the greatness of PC gaming to a comfortable space usually controlled by video game consoles. A living room gaming PC (which is sometimes called a Steam machine, when it is hooked up with Steam's own operating system) grants you the capability to play your favourite PC games from your couch, with the games displayed in full glory on a television. Many users then take advantage of Valve's various offerings (their operating system and/or their Steam Big Picture mode) for a straightforward and convenient interface with Steam that is controller-friendly.

Last year, Dota 2 and League of Legends, two of the most popular video games on the planet, dominated esports earnings. If you want hard numbers, here you go: The Dota 2 International's prize pool topped $24 million, while the League of Legends World Championship fell just shy of $5 million. So, get those mice and keyboards ready, and prepare to grind.

PC gaming historically has been credited as the best for its online multiplayer functionality. However, consoles have since aimed to catch up with improvements with in-game communication and online game sharing, which is great for playing with friends. If it’s multiplayer gaming with friends you’re most interested in, you will need to consider which system your friends play on, as few consoles and games support cross-platform capability.
If money is no object, the best hardware is the Xbox One X (£449.99), followed by the cheaper PS4 Pro (£349), but you’d need a 4K TV set to get the best out of either. For most buyers, the best buys are the Xbox One S (£249.99) and the PS4 Slim (£259). All four have 8GB of memory and custom 8-core AMD processors, though the graphics and storage vary somewhat. They can all run apps for streaming, including BBC iPlayer, something the Nintendo Switch cannot.
This is a chair that is specifically designed for those who work day-to-day with technology as the Gesture comes with ergonomic 8-hour support (we know, game sessions go longer than that!). The chair is quick to make adjustments and molds to the user, no matter the body type. People have various preferences in the way that they sit, but what makes the Gestures so great is the type of person you are isn’t really relative as it comes with great versatility. If you sit for long hours a day whether playing online games or for work, the Steelcase Gesture comes in as premium and high-end. In our opinion however, it is worth the price if you want to be free of that well-being, long-term posture and physical health guilt.
All told, at the time we purchased these items, the build cost $1,022.62, but that fell to $992 after rebates. Prices will fluctuate, of course, with sales and availability, but we were able to just about hit our target. If these components become too pricey in the future, you'll no doubt be able to find similarly priced alternatives to put together a comparable machine.

Any gaming setup needs a wonderful spot to enjoy your games. You want to be comfy while getting the best visual experience when gaming on console or PC. There are a couple of gaming lounges that you can check out for the living room. If your looking to choose a gaming chair then check out what you should look for in your gaming chair choice. You'll want to make sure that the quality of your TV or monitor will match your gaming machine of choice. All the latest consoles come with 4K quality and anything on a PC can be up to 4K.  You need to pick a monitor or TV capable of displaying that quality though. Pair all this with your PC or console of choice and you'll have the best gaming setup.


It is a battle as old as time itself, which console is better? Everyone has their favourite, just like in the Apple V Android debate. There are many different reasons to like each side. Each have exclusive titles to the platform, different features, and different specs. Some stick with one system over another out of loyalty while others heavily weigh the options on both consoles. Lets compare the specs to see what the real difference is. If you aren't interested in the nitty gritty, tech heavy details, then you might want to skip this bit. With the latest release of the Xbox One X, both platforms are almost neck and neck in technical specifications as shown below.
All these companies are assembling the same types of PC from similar parts, and they often build them to order, so you can vary the specifications to suit your own preferences. It would take a long time to research all the options and compare possible builds on PC Partpicker, which is what a real PC gamer would do. The best motherboards really do cost more.

Note that with a Linux-based OS, you’ll need to install proprietary drivers manually, which can be a little tricky and will likely require some Google research. This option takes some extra leg work, because the drivers that Linux distributions usually ship with aren’t suited for playing games. That said, this is the cheapest way to get a broadly useful and reliable desktop-style operating system.

Part of what makes a console enjoyable is sticking a game in and having the game just work. We tend to have to tinker with settings on PCs. Luckily, if you’re on Windows, GeForce Experience and AMD Raptr have automatic game optimization functions based on your system specifications. It’s not perfect, but it gets you playing the game at roughly the right settings quickly.
Whether you're looking for PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch consoles and games or you're a PC gamer, the Amazon.co.uk Video Games store has everything you need, all at everyday low prices. From the current-generations to the classic Xbox 360, PS3 and Nintendo Wii, handheld gaming with Nintendo 3DS and PS Vita and even PSP we have a huge selection for you.
And then you must deal with the bugs. Console fans often overstate the problems found on PC, and modern game consoles aren’t immune to crashing, but it remains true that bugs are more common on a computer than a game console. We aren’t just talking about hard crashes, which are rare. Instead, it’s the small stuff that becomes an issue. A game might fail to load properly because it wasn’t run in administrator mode, the Wi-Fi adapter might occasionally lose connection, or a USB port might go on the fritz.
The opportunity to sell cheap Ryzen/Vega games PCs was immediately clear to small British PC manufacturers, and there may be dozens of models available. UK suppliers include Chillblast, Cyberpower, Falcon, Fierce, Gladiator, Mesh, Novatech, Overclockers, PC Specialist, Punch Technology, Scan, Stormforce, Utopia and Zoostorm. I haven’t checked all their websites, but I expect most of them offer at least a couple of models. The problem is that I have no way of knowing which is best, or even if there is a best.

All these companies are assembling the same types of PC from similar parts, and they often build them to order, so you can vary the specifications to suit your own preferences. It would take a long time to research all the options and compare possible builds on PC Partpicker, which is what a real PC gamer would do. The best motherboards really do cost more.
This case's big, tempered-glass windows on four sides will highlight the components, and it includes eye-catching fan lighting on the front. It made things more fun, and it also saved us from having to install our own lighting during a live build. (The fans and their lighting come pre-wired.) It also looked relatively easily to build in, and who doesn't want that? At $127 at this writing, this chassis is certainly pricier than necessary—if you're cutting it close, you can easily shave money off with a less expensive case. But it looks great.
This setup is for the fan of Gundam, a Japanese anime. It is made pretty obvious with the actions figures that are displayed on the two shelves. This setup includes GTX1070 with AMD FX8350 CPU. The black and white desk is backlighted with purple and blue LEDs.It gives this a fascinating outlook and also has a MacBook to handle some personal/official tasking. If you are a Japanese action anime lover then welcome to discover what products Faruqi A has. It is the best Gaming Setups which will impress you indeed.
Anyone who's a gamer knows that for as long as there has been a divide between console gaming and PC gaming, there has been a debate on which is better. The console gamers have often argued that by virtue of their devices being dedicated gaming machines, consoles were better suited for gaming. PC gamers would counter-argue that PC machines have far more computing power than their console counterparts, and thus are for true gamers. The debate is only further muddied by the fact that many of today's consoles are now designed as do-everything machines. They can just as easily be used to watch Netflix or Hulu as they can be used for gaming. Which begs the question: If consoles are starting to emulate computers, what do they offer the modern gamer?
The second most obvious advantage is simplicity. Let's face it, PC gaming can be a technical nightmare compared to console gaming. People can take a console home and be playing a game within minutes. There are no operating systems to configure or drivers to update, and better still, no purchasing a game only to find out that it isn't compatible with your PC for some obscure reason.
This was a tricky one. We originally budgeted for an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060—a modest but effective HD gaming card. Most of the time with that card, in most games, you get at least 60 frames per second (fps) in 1,920 by 1,080 gameplay with settings at or near maximum. But it's not a powerhouse. The GeForce GTX 1060 Founders Edition retails for $299, so from the start we were picking the rest of the components with a GTX 1060 at that price in mind. As the process went on, though, we were tempted by the more powerful GeForce GTX 1070. Something about going through all of the trouble to build a gaming-specific machine only to use a GTX 1060 just felt underwhelming.
In the battle of console vs. PC, many gamers are starting to migrate away from consoles to gaming laptops and desktops. The reasons for this are many. The side that people chose in the PC vs. console gaming debate used to be dictated in part by the game titles that most interested them. In the market's infancy, many titles were exclusively offered on one platform or the other – not both.
We try to provide an interesting new angle for you to consider when buying your next gaming peripheral, and while almost every piece of gear that’s used by pro players is objectively a good piece of equipment we do encourage you to take our gear results with a grain of salt and to always do your own research before purchasing a new mouse, monitor, or keyboard.
We’ll also give you a sneak peek at what’s under the hood so you can understand why it’s really on our list. With these, you should be well on your way to making your dream setup reality. If you’re inexperienced with PC building, you might want to make sure you want to familiarize yourself with how to build a gaming PC before looking over the best gaming setups of 2019.

What makes this one a pick for the best gaming gear however, is the keyboards full-key matrix anti-ghosting mechanism that is perfect for enhancing your accuracy and making sure you’re safe of sticky-keys. Not only does this keyboard look great on your PC or laptop, but its light-weight and can be durable for as long as you need it to be. Sometimes it’s the little things that can thoroughly improve your game, so let the Corsair Vengeance K70 do it all, and get it for quite the reasonable price since it’s a bit cheaper than our previous Razer pick if you wanted to save some cash.


Whether you’re looking for a top-tier headset with legendary comfort and amazing audio, or precision mice and keyboards designed for digital domination, HyperX has all the gear serious gamers need. HyperX is committed to providing the ultimate gaming experience, and is constantly implementing feedback to create the most refined products possible. It’s no wonder that pro, hardcore, and casual gamers worldwide choose HyperX for all their peripheral needs.

PC and console gamers both want the most bang for their buck, but what that looks like and how it’s measured is different for each group. For a console gamer, costs are generally limited to purchasing the console, extra controllers, games, and perhaps online multiplayer passes. For a PC gamer, there’s a wide variety of options to buy if you choose to build your own computer, but not every PC gamer has their own custom-built machine.
so uhh.. ya pc is cheaper, no subscription bull shit. Oh and half my pc was free, got an old dell optiplex 7010 for FREE, then bought an Rx 580 for 189... boom. A INSTANT console killer since i could still do vr unlike psvr's horrible way of vr. AND you console prick, with how consoles work these day... Consoles, just don't work, recently Microsoft added an update that made ALL Xbox connected to the internet unusable because of a BUG. Guess what, I typed this on a, you guessed it and keyboard not a controller because if i was, It wouldn't even be done... ANNND have you ever seen the worlds faster typer on controler? though so. PC MASTER RACE All the way... Period.
Let's not go overboard. There are plenty of terrible people on consoles too. There are benefits to both. Consoles are a stable development platform which means games tend to run with less bugs (otherwise everyone has them). But there are also significant benefits to a PC. The graphics as of this point are significantly better on PC. Seeing a game at 2k or 4k running @ 144Hz (w/ gsync or freesync) is truly amazing and substantially better than 1080p (many games on consoles don't even truly render 1080p either. They are rendered lower and upscaled). But it costs you a lot more than a console for that experience. As with anything there are good parts and bad parts.
In many ways, the case you choose sets the tone for the whole build. It's obviously the most visual piece of the puzzle, so its aesthetic determines the theme and color scheme. Because of the need for some camera-friendly flash, we went with the Lian Li Alpha 550W chassis. This midsize tower was a big factor in deciding to go with a black-and-white theme for the rest of the parts—a clean, modern style.
If money is no object, the best hardware is the Xbox One X (£449.99), followed by the cheaper PS4 Pro (£349), but you’d need a 4K TV set to get the best out of either. For most buyers, the best buys are the Xbox One S (£249.99) and the PS4 Slim (£259). All four have 8GB of memory and custom 8-core AMD processors, though the graphics and storage vary somewhat. They can all run apps for streaming, including BBC iPlayer, something the Nintendo Switch cannot.
This case's big, tempered-glass windows on four sides will highlight the components, and it includes eye-catching fan lighting on the front. It made things more fun, and it also saved us from having to install our own lighting during a live build. (The fans and their lighting come pre-wired.) It also looked relatively easily to build in, and who doesn't want that? At $127 at this writing, this chassis is certainly pricier than necessary—if you're cutting it close, you can easily shave money off with a less expensive case. But it looks great.
Built for the battlefield, the HyperX Alloy Elite is loaded with fast, accurate, and comfortable Cherry MX Red switches and a durable steel frame. RGB backlit keys and a brilliant 18-LED light bar keep you fragging away long into the night. It’s also equipped to meet your multimedia needs with dedicated media buttons, USB 2.0, Game Mode, anti-ghosting, and N-Key rollover.
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