The best gear for gaming is a broad phrase, and in our case today, could mean a number of popular upgrades, such as headsets, mice, keyboards, laptops, computers, controllers and more. As we continue to delve into the gaming gear world and research the best of the best to help our readers out in their search for the perfect gaming setup, we’re met with a much larger guide here to serve a broader purpose — to help you either pick or choose which pieces of the best gaming gear you need next, or to buy an entire new setup all at once. Regardless of your specific needs here today, let’s get down to what we feel is not only the best gear for gaming to upgrade, but our top recommendations for each as well. Who knows, there may be a few picks in here you didn’t even thought you needed until today.
Wow, developers care more about mobile then you, also in your eyes we might be demanding, but if your referring to us wanting to play our games how we want to and not let any company screw us over then I guess we are demanding. I noticed that after I switched from Xbox to pc I had more fun gaming, the people were nicer generally and people are more willing to help new players.

If a PC computer or Mac aren’t your thing and you prefer to game on a laptop (whether you’re traveling or just prefer the sleek and versatile build of them), we have one of the best right here. The HP Omen is a gaming laptop that’ll give some PC’s a run for their money when it comes to capabilities. We remember back in the day attempting to game on a laptop but couldn’t come close to getting the quality we needed — it was barely recommended to try doing so (and keep in mind we were running Counter-Strike 1.6). Nowadays however in this year, times have definitely changed.
Custom built gaming pc I built this pc for Christmas but don't get much use. Runs top games like Fortnite and gta v etc perfectly.   Gigabyte GA-B85-HD3 Motherboard Intel Core i5 4460 3.2 Ghz processor 8GB RAM Corsair VS650 Power supply Coolmaster double fan cpu cooler 120GB Kingston SSD 2x 2TB HDD (4TB total) Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti 4GB Windows 10 Professional installed on SSD Bluetooth (dongle) 1x Power Cable  RGB LED Lighting No Headset included with bundle. Can be shown working COLLECTION ONLY OR WIĹL DROP OFF WITHIN 10 MILES Any questions feel free to ask

And games from third-party AAA publishers universally land on PCs. Point being: Buying a PC rarely means missing out on console games these days. Sure, you won’t be able to play handful of first-party titles on Sony’s end, but everything else makes it over—and often (barring edge cases like Arkham Knight) in better condition than the console versions.
But there are so many console games on PCs nowadays, it’s only natural you want to play some of them with the original control scheme. Dark Souls comes to mind, as does Assassin’s Creed. These games just play better on a gamepad. Luckily, it’s easier than ever to connect an Xbox One controller or a DualShock 4 to your PC, either wired or (in the case of the Xbox One S and DS4) with Bluetooth. And most games support controllers on the PC these days, especially the big multi-platform releases.

What’s the best gaming gear upgrade without a sturdy backbone to handle it all? Cue your PC, and since gaming computers are consistently evolving while at the same time games are increasing in the demand for RAM, processing as well as video card capabilities, you need to make sure your rig can support it all, otherwise these smaller gear upgrades are basically moot. Here’s one of our favorite gaming computers out there at the moment. These PC’s are super quiet, 4K and VR ready, overclockable, and are built like tanks. Now before we list the exact specifications, do know that there are quite a few combinations and versions they offer in order meet the demands of certain price-points, which we love so all readers can fine-tune their cash flow into which Corsair One is best for them.

In conclusion, among the 20 best gaming setups we have lined up here. There are many choices to choose from, some are simple, some with grand lighting or some comprises the whole room and some has incredible CPUs. Most of these are not as friendly as a budget gaming setup but to make a mind-blowing setup, one has to put some effort and money into making it.


It is a battle as old as time itself, which console is better? Everyone has their favourite, just like in the Apple V Android debate. There are many different reasons to like each side. Each have exclusive titles to the platform, different features, and different specs. Some stick with one system over another out of loyalty while others heavily weigh the options on both consoles. Lets compare the specs to see what the real difference is. If you aren't interested in the nitty gritty, tech heavy details, then you might want to skip this bit. With the latest release of the Xbox One X, both platforms are almost neck and neck in technical specifications as shown below.
For another entry in the "made to be seen" column for this build, we went for two 4GB sticks of GeIL Super Luce RGB Sync DDR4 memory. For years, RAM had been a relatively low-cost part of PC builds, but RAM prices have spiked in 2018 and have yet to come back down. That said, $79 for 8GB is a pretty good deal, and the RGB strips add yet more pizzazz to proceedings.
4. Console gaming is generally cheaper upfront, or if you only plan to play around 6 months. PC will have a lot longer period of upgrade, and if you buy a decent hardwares (that can't be all dirt-cheap), you will upgrade cheaply and don't need to buy all your games all over again. Games on PC is waayyy cheaper. A lot are free, and don't you ever heard of steam sale? (Epic is also opening up shop, and it will give you free games every two weeks).

This was one of the best things about the firing up my Steam account on a then-new Windows 10 PC gaming rig—all the games that I purchased on my old Windows 7 laptop worked without a hitch. In fact, I only have one game, a disc-based version of Outrun 2006: Coast 2 Coast, that simply refuses to play. And thanks to emulation, the PC is pretty damn good in regards to games preservation.


PC gaming historically has been credited as the best for its online multiplayer functionality. However, consoles have since aimed to catch up with improvements with in-game communication and online game sharing, which is great for playing with friends. If it’s multiplayer gaming with friends you’re most interested in, you will need to consider which system your friends play on, as few consoles and games support cross-platform capability.
This is a great budget computer, it's great for completing work on and using programs like Autocad, all of the Microsoft programs (e.g. Word, PowerPoint, etc...) and Photoshop. It's quite good at running older games and a couple of new ones like Minecraft. Unfortunately, if you're looking to play more modern games like PUBG, Fortnite or Battlefield, then you will definitely need to upgrade the graphics card and the processor to get higher FPS and graphics.

Microsoft, I must admit, is making good strides in the console space. Thanks to the Xbox Backward Compatibility plan, you can play select Xbox and Xbox 360 games on the Xbox One, Xbox One S, or Xbox One X. In fact, if you own a Xbox One X machine, the old games that you have in either physical or digital form receive performance boosts. Microsoft also offers the $9.99-per-month Game Pass, an all-you-can-eat, Netflix-style service that includes Xbox 360 and original Xbox games.
Gaming PCs contain a higher end & more powerful graphics card as compared to traditional PCs. gaming laptops are also becoming more available as gaming grows increasingly more mobile. A large difference between a gaming laptop and a normal laptop is the cooling components. Gaming puts a heavy strain on both the GPU (graphics processing unit) and CPU (central processing unit) which generates more heat and therefore needs a more sophisticated cooling system.
In the battle of console vs. PC, many gamers are starting to migrate away from consoles to gaming laptops and desktops. The reasons for this are many. The side that people chose in the PC vs. console gaming debate used to be dictated in part by the game titles that most interested them. In the market's infancy, many titles were exclusively offered on one platform or the other – not both.

The best gear for gaming is a broad phrase, and in our case today, could mean a number of popular upgrades, such as headsets, mice, keyboards, laptops, computers, controllers and more. As we continue to delve into the gaming gear world and research the best of the best to help our readers out in their search for the perfect gaming setup, we’re met with a much larger guide here to serve a broader purpose — to help you either pick or choose which pieces of the best gaming gear you need next, or to buy an entire new setup all at once. Regardless of your specific needs here today, let’s get down to what we feel is not only the best gear for gaming to upgrade, but our top recommendations for each as well. Who knows, there may be a few picks in here you didn’t even thought you needed until today.
Professional teams do often have a gear sponsor. In most cases the players can still use their own personal mouse choice when competing though. There’s still cases of players being forced to use sponsor gear (even if they don’t feel comfortable with the mouse shapes the sponsor has to offer, for example) but we feel these cases are becoming increasingly rare. When we analyze a professional we will always consider the gear they actually use for competing instead of the gear that they’re paid to advertise.
And so, after a lot of rationalizing and budget-slicing, we ended up with a Founders Edition GeForce GTX 1070. Its $399 price means some concessions to storage and memory, but we felt it was worth making them. A graphics card is the main factor in the performance ceiling of a gaming machine, and going with a solid but not great option didn't sit right. This card also allows you to play at a higher resolution than 1080p with better frame rates (say, if you have a 1440p monitor). On the flip side, you might feel, understandably, that a GTX 1060 is plenty for this type of rig—and that choice gives you $100 to put toward other components. Our reviews at the link will give you an idea of the frame rates you will achieve with the different cards in different games.
This is a pretty modest gaming machine, taking advantage of relatively impressive integrated graphics performance on its CPU. It will be able to run a majority of games on SteamOS, and it should run many graphically intense games on medium settings. The pricing on this machine makes it financially competitive with the current generation of consoles.

Big Picture Mode is an alternative Steam interface, and one you’ll likely become very familiar with if you decide to build a Steam Machine. If you’re curious about it and want to play around with the interface, it’s available on Steam for any computer. Go to the top right corner of your main Steam window, and click the controller icon. Immediately, you’ll launch Big Picture Mode.
The component that gave us the most trouble was the CPU cooler. It didn't stump us, fortunately, or stop the build, but it required some trial and error. We used the Deepcool Gammaxx GT RGB, which we had on hand in the office. The Core i5-8400 comes with a stock cooler that's adequate for cooling at no additional cost. So you don't absolutely need the Gammaxx, thus its exclusion from our pricing total. Since we had it around, though, its RGB-laden logo and fan made it a no-brainer inclusion.
This was a tricky one. We originally budgeted for an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060—a modest but effective HD gaming card. Most of the time with that card, in most games, you get at least 60 frames per second (fps) in 1,920 by 1,080 gameplay with settings at or near maximum. But it's not a powerhouse. The GeForce GTX 1060 Founders Edition retails for $299, so from the start we were picking the rest of the components with a GTX 1060 at that price in mind. As the process went on, though, we were tempted by the more powerful GeForce GTX 1070. Something about going through all of the trouble to build a gaming-specific machine only to use a GTX 1060 just felt underwhelming.
It’s not unusual to see pre-orders for big games go for 10 or even 20 percent off on Steam, and by six months post-release many big games will fall to $15 or $20 during a sale. Or lower. Great indie games often go for under $10 or even $5 on sale if you’re patient. Consoles? Even on sale, most many AAA games seem to bottom out around $30 for years on end.
Picking the platform based on games can be tricky. If you are a huge fan of MMORPG’s then the getting a desktop PC is your best bet. It offers the best selections of MMORPGs. While computers are great for first-person shooter games also like Call of Duty and all, we however prefer both PS4 Pro and the Xbox One S over it. It is just more fun playing first person shooters on a console and with thousands of other games online. If you mostly play sports game then you can go with any of the three platform since most sports related games are multi-platform with the exception of a limited few.
And then you must deal with the bugs. Console fans often overstate the problems found on PC, and modern game consoles aren’t immune to crashing, but it remains true that bugs are more common on a computer than a game console. We aren’t just talking about hard crashes, which are rare. Instead, it’s the small stuff that becomes an issue. A game might fail to load properly because it wasn’t run in administrator mode, the Wi-Fi adapter might occasionally lose connection, or a USB port might go on the fritz.
Nintendo has been releasing consoles side by side with the big companies. The Wii came out just over a year after the Xbox 360 and brought a new idea to gaming, motion gaming. Wii U moved towards a handheld experience, allowing gamers to play their games from anywhere in the household using the gamepad. Nintendo's Switch was the most recent release, a powerful fully portable console that is able to be taken and used anywhere. As Nintendo has grown we have seen a shift to more remote gaming. While the Switch is able to be hooked up to a TV, most people still consider it more of a handheld console. This is one of the reasons why Nintendo usually isn't included in the console war. The other reason is the power in their consoles. The graphics and capabilities of Nintendo's consoles has never been able to rival the Xbox and the PlayStation. The Nintendo Switch is becoming a competitor though. With great titles like Zelda Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey, the Switch is being considered more of a must have in any gaming setup.
With consoles, you only have to worry about your budget and desire to play 4K games. In addition, unlike PCs, consoles continue to perform smoothly and run the latest games even after a couple of years of use. PC rigs generally wear out quicker and you will be forced to upgrade two or three years down the line (especially if you want to try out the most recent games).
Ultimately, this decision comes down to what kind of games you want to play on your Steam Machine, and how much money you're willing to invest in it. Do you want to play a wide variety of games directly on the Steam Machine, or are you happy to stream to the Steam Machine from your desktop PC? Are you perfectly content with the Linux game library, or do you find the nonexistent price of a Linux-based OS too enticing to pass up?
It’s not unusual to see pre-orders for big games go for 10 or even 20 percent off on Steam, and by six months post-release many big games will fall to $15 or $20 during a sale. Or lower. Great indie games often go for under $10 or even $5 on sale if you’re patient. Consoles? Even on sale, most many AAA games seem to bottom out around $30 for years on end.
After we decided on, ordered, and finally, received all the parts, the time came for the actual build. As opposed to some builds we've done in the past, no one unusual component in this system added a twist or caused trouble. We've installed strange coolers and built in constraining cases, but the parts in this desktop are straightforward. Because of that, we weren't especially wary going in—but you never know what a build will throw at you.
That said, PCs still offer the largest selection of online games, and some of the most popular online games, such as World of Warcraft, are exclusive to the PC. Of course, there are many things to consider before deciding on a gaming platform. Foremost among these is deciding which games you want to play, how much money you want to spend, and whether you need a PC for other purposes. Ideally, having both is the best solution, but not everyone can do that, so here is a quick comparison of the two.
All told, at the time we purchased these items, the build cost $1,022.62, but that fell to $992 after rebates. Prices will fluctuate, of course, with sales and availability, but we were able to just about hit our target. If these components become too pricey in the future, you'll no doubt be able to find similarly priced alternatives to put together a comparable machine.
Lian Li's Alpha tower includes a small pedestal near the front on which you can install your boot drive, and it was strangely satisfying to mount the SSD to this little metal stand and screw it into the case, propped up like a trophy. The SSD isn't the most eye-catching item, but it gains some celebrity when it's on display like that. Hiding the cables leading up to this lone plinth is a little tricky once it's plugged in, but it's a nice touch. The RAM was similarly easy to install, and we wanted to get it in there before the DIMM slots were made difficult to reach due to other components getting in the way.
The choice generally comes down to a Ryzen 3 2200G with Vega 8 graphics or the more expensive Ryzen 5 2400G with Vega 11 graphics. While both are quad-core processors, the Ryzen 5 supports twice as many threads, so should have better performance. However, side-by-side comparisons on YouTube suggest there’s not a massive difference, and for budget PC gaming, the Ryzen 3 2200G looks unbeatable value for money.
Ghosting can really get in the way of intense gaming or hard work so Anti-Ghosting can be a key feature of a great gaming keyboard. Ghosting occurs when multiple keys are pressed simultaneously but not all are registered, those missed are said to have been ‘ghosted’. Anti-Ghosting supports simultaneous keystrokes so your moves are never missed in the game.
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