"I credit PlayStation for my enduring fighting game obsession. My buddies and I started with the idiot Tekken 2, graduated to Street Fighter Alpha 3 where I learned the uselessness of combo memorization, moseyed over to Dead or Alive because we were teenage boys, and eventually settled on Guilty Gear. My friends are brothers, and trash talk often ended in fraternal violence. Good times."
Though it is admittedly strange-looking and we can’t begin to fathom what the designers were thinking when creating the controller, the Magnavox Odyssey still ranks amongst the best systems of all time for one simple reason: it was the absolute first commercial home gaming console. In fact, though Pong is technically a separate IP, the Odyssey featured the first ping-pong style video game. Truth be told, the short list of games for the system, numbered 28 in total, were more like novelties than the fully-fledged experiences of later consoles. Whatever the case, this Magnavox-built gaming machine was revolutionary, and that makes it special.
It did not help that NEC marched right into a perfect storm. The Turbo was released in August of 1989, just as the hype wars between the SEGA Genesis, the NES, and incoming Super NES were at a fever pitch. The pack-in game, Keith Courage in Alpha Zones, was an unknown compared to Altered Beast for the Genesis, which was a port of a popular arcade game that looked remarkably close to the coin-op version. Though the launch library had a couple of gems, like the pinballer Alien Crush, there was just no shaking the competition. The Turbo did not benefit from early realization that the machine was just straight-up underpowered compared to the Genesis. It didn't even have a second controller port; you needed to buy a peripheral so two people could play at the same time. It's no wonder the Turbo quickly fell to fourth place behind the NES, Super NES, and Genesis -- and stayed there.
Enter the Nintendo Wii, a system that put much more emphasis on the user interface than it did on the high definition, surround sound experience. The way we play was the biggest change to what we play: the idea was to introduce something that anyone could pick up and understand, and with the new input, it was hoped, a new market would form and a new audience would step forward to play games.
The Wii was a huge hit when it was originally introduced. It’s still one of the most fun gaming consoles to own. You know all the bad rep gaming consoles get because everyone is sitting down and pushing buttons on a controller? Well, the Wii lets you get up and play video games. It’s highly interactive. For example, you can use the Wii controller as a tennis racket to play virtual tennis in front of your TV screen. There are games specifically designed for the Wii to play as close to real-life as possible. It’s almost like augmented reality in a sense.
"Mere weeks after I bought the Dreamcast, my VMU--or "Virtual Memory Unit," aka memory card with a useless LCD screen--started beeping at me in desperate want of new batteries. I never even unplugged the thing from the controller, must've shipped with bum batteries. I dutifully loaded the VMU with a fresh set, and in less than a month it was beeping again. That was the only time I bothered, and now that beeping triggers in me a response not too unlike the salivation of Pavlov's dogs. Except I pine for Marvel vs. Capcom 2, not Kibbles 'n Bits. "
You need a good gamepad to play games, and both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have them. The Xbox One gamepad is a slightly updated version of the Xbox 360 controller, with a more rounded feel and trigger buttons that offer individual force feedback. The DualShock 4, the PS4's gamepad, is a completely overhauled controller that keeps the best parts of the DualShock 3 and fixes the worst. The analog sticks feel better, the triggers are more responsive, and the controller just feels nicer in the hand. It even features a built-in speaker and a potentially useful touchpad in the middle.

"Mere weeks after I bought the Dreamcast, my VMU--or "Virtual Memory Unit," aka memory card with a useless LCD screen--started beeping at me in desperate want of new batteries. I never even unplugged the thing from the controller, must've shipped with bum batteries. I dutifully loaded the VMU with a fresh set, and in less than a month it was beeping again. That was the only time I bothered, and now that beeping triggers in me a response not too unlike the salivation of Pavlov's dogs. Except I pine for Marvel vs. Capcom 2, not Kibbles 'n Bits. "
Despite its comparably short lifespan, the SEGA Dreamcast was the first system in the sixth generation of video game consoles, which included the PlayStation 2, GameCube, and Xbox. The Dreamcast first hit stores in 1998, over two years before the PS2 and three years before the GameCube and Xbox. Although the Dreamcast had sizable chronological leeway over its contemporaries, it was inevitably stifled by stiff competition and the advent of DVD technology. But before it met its untimely demise in 2001, the Dreamcast certainly left its mark on the console industry.
The world of tablets can be quite expensive. This is a great solution for people like me who don't want to commit to a tablet which costs hundreds of pounds. Build quality is great and feature are really good too. The Xbox controller is ace, it lets me play on my xbox whilst allowing my girlfriend to watch telly so we're both pleased! Totally recommend.
Eighth-generation Nintendo consoles (Nintendo 3DS and Wii U) took advantage of the services provided by the Nintendo Network, including purchase and download of full titles, Virtual Console games, downloadable games (including most DSiWare/WiiWare titles), DLC, non-gaming apps, game demos, and other material. Nintendo Network also allowed online-gaming support to be provided either for free or for a premium cost. Nintendo also offered its own social network in the form of Miiverse, which was shut down in 2017.
"Believe it or not, my fondest memory of the Saturn had nothing to do with getting one -- but rather, drooling over the games I wanted before I did. Reading magazine articles and ogling ads that featured Albert Odyssey, Panzer Dragoon Saga, Burning Rangers, NiGHTs and Dragon Force had me second-guessing my choice to go with PlayStation and Nintendo 64. The day I finally got the system, and most of the titles I mentioned, was a good day indeed."
Both the Xbox One S and the PlayStation 4 can play Blu-ray movies and access a variety of online streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus. The Xbox One S goes two extra steps with television integration and Ultra HD Blu-ray playback. An HDMI pass-through lets you run your cable or satellite box through the system, though without a Kinect you'll need a third-party infrared blaster to control it. This incorporates live television through your cable or satellite provider into the Xbox One's menu system. You can also add over-the-air television with a third-party USB tuner. The OneGuide program guide displays both live television and what content is available on services like Hulu Plus and Machinima, giving you total control over what you watch, and you can even enjoy a split screen view of what's on television while you play your favorite game or browse the web, thanks to the Xbox One's Snap feature. If that isn't enough, the Xbox One S can play Ultra HD Blu-ray discs, which means you can watch 4K HDR movies on physical media. Bizarrely, Sony didn't add this feature to the PS4 Pro.

With it, you can browse games in the Official PlayStation Store, which has access to over 500 titles for when you need something new to play. You’ll have access to cross-platform titles, indie games and re-releases from past consoles along with more exclusive titles than any other console on the market, including Uncharted, Spider-Man and Driveclub. Though the console is the largest on the market, its modern design makes it look slim. Plus, its matte black exterior helps it blend in with your other electronics. It ships with a 1TB hard drive, though you can opt to upgrade it to 2TB or plug in an external hard drive. Inside, you’ll find a 2.1GHz eight-core AMD Jaguar CPU and a 4.2 TFLOP AMD Radeon-based graphics card, which is paired with 8GB of GDDR5 RAM. The powerful system consistently maintains 1080p output and high frame rates. The updated DualShock 4 controller boasts Bluetooth connectivity and can charge via micro-USB so you aren’t permanently tethered to your console. The glowing light bar located along the front of each controller helps identify player one from player two, and even adds a little atmospheric lighting. New features on the controller include a capacitive touch pad, a 3.5mm audio jack, a built-in speaker and a dedicated screen capture button for saving screenshots and sharing them online.
^ Tabuchi, Hiroko (March 23, 2010). "Nintendo to Make 3-D Version of Its DS Handheld Game". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved April 4, 2010. 'We wanted to give the gaming industry a head’s up about what to expect from Nintendo at E3,' said Ken Toyoda, chief spokesman at Nintendo. 'We'll invite people to play with the new device then.'
Though Sony’s PlayStation overshadowed it in sales, the Nintendo 64 had a stable fan base from its previous generational consoles. The Nintendo 64 was one of the first consoles that not only allowed up to four controllers for multiplayer but also introduced the world to rumble control capability with its Rumble Pak functionality. Even to this day, debatably, the Nintendo 64 is one of the most accessible multiplayer systems around, perfect for those millennial parties yearning for nostalgia and simple offline multiplayer fun.
Several consoles such as the Master System and the TurboGrafx-16 have used different types of smart cards as an external medium. These cards function similar to simple cartridges. Information is stored on a chip that is housed in plastic. Cards are more compact and simpler than cartridges, though. This makes them cheaper to produce and smaller, but limits what can be done with them. Cards cannot hold extra components, and common cartridge techniques like bank switching (a technique used to create very large games) were impossible to miniaturize into a card in the late 1980s.[84][85] Compact Discs reduced much of the need for cards. Optical Discs can hold more information than cards, and are cheaper to produce. The Nintendo GameCube and the PlayStation 2 use memory cards for storage, but the PlayStation Vita, Nintendo 3DS, and Nintendo Switch are currently the only modern systems to use cards for game distribution. Nintendo has long used cartridges with their Game Boy line of hand held consoles because of their durability, small size, stability (not shaking and vibrating the handheld when it is in use), and low battery consumption. Nintendo switched to cards starting with the DS, because advances in memory technology made putting extra memory on the cartridge unnecessary.[86] The PlayStation Vita uses Sony's own proprietary flash-memory Vita cards as one method of game distribution.[87]
To compete with emerging next gen consoles, Nintendo released Donkey Kong Country which could display a wide range of tones (something common in fifth-generation games) by limiting the number of hues onscreen, and Star Fox which used an extra chip inside of the cartridge to display polygon graphics. Sega followed suit, releasing Vectorman and Virtua Racing (the latter of which used the Sega Virtua Processor). Sega also released the 32X, an add-on for the Genesis, while their Sega Saturn was still in development. Despite public statements from Sega claiming that they would continue to support the Genesis/32X throughout the next generation, Sega Enterprises forced Sega of America to abandon the 32X. The 32X's brief and confusing existence damaged public perception of the coming Saturn and Sega as a whole.
Today's games are bigger, better, and more immersive than ever. You can find incredible games across a wide range of genres. Most major game franchises are available on both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, while the Nintendo Switch offers a large selection of games suited for kids and families. For the most realistic visual experiences, upgrade to the PlayStation 4 Pro or Xbox One S to enjoy breathtaking 4K and HDR gaming. Exclusive titles are available for each console, which further underscores the need to plan ahead and pick up the right system for your must-own games. Explore the massive collections of previously played games at great deals and give your older consoles like the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Nintendo Wii U continued life.

Gaming consoles span several major brands, including Nintendo, Playstation, and Xbox. They also span several generations, with the PS4 console being the latest Playstation and the Xbox One X console being the latest from Microsoft. If you’re looking to play at home, traditional gaming consoles offer stunning HD graphic capabilities thanks to Blu-Ray technology, and the Wii gives you the chance to get active too. If you want to be able to take interactive gaming with you on the move, handheld models also offer up 3D graphics, touchscreen control, WiFi and 3G connectivity, movie and video playback as well as incredible gameplay.
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