Sony's PlayStation 3 was released in Japan on November 11, 2006, in North America on November 17, 2006, and in Europe and Australia on March 23, 2007. All PlayStation 3's come with a hard drive and are able to play Blu-ray Disc games and Blu-ray Disc movies out of the box. The PlayStation 3 was the first video game console to support HDMI output out of the box, using full 1080p resolution. Up to seven controllers can connect to the console using Bluetooth. There are 6 discontinued versions of the PS3: a 20 GB HDD version (discontinued in North America and Japan, and was never released in PAL territories), a 40 GB HDD version (discontinued), a 60 GB HDD version (discontinued in North America, Japan and PAL territories), 80 GB HDD version (only in some NTSC territories and PAL territories), a "slim" 120GB HDD version (discontinued), and a "slim" 250 GB version (discontinued). The two current shipping versions of the PlayStation 3 are: a "slim" 160 GB HDD version and a "slim" 320 GB HDD version. The hard drive can be replaced with any standard 2.5" Serial ATA drive and the system has support for removable media storage, such as Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick PRO Duo, USB, SD, MiniSD, and CompactFlash (CF) digital media, but only the PlayStation versions up to 80 GB support this. The slim PlayStation 3 consoles (120 GB and up) had removable storage discontinued.[50] All models are backward compatible with the original PlayStation's software library, and the launch models, since discontinued, are also backward compatible with PlayStation 2 games. As a cost-cutting measure, later models removed the Emotion Engine, making them incompatible with PlayStation 2 discs. In 2010, Sony released PlayStation Move, allowing for motion-controlled games. With recent software updates, the PlayStation 3 can play 3D Blu-ray movies and 3D games.
^ "Screen digest Archived September 12, 2016, at the Wayback Machine." Screen Digest Ltd., 1995. Retrieved from Google Books on November 2, 2011. "Sega tackles Indian market with local maker From spring 1995, Sega will start manufacturing video games consoles in India with local partner Shaw Wallace. Move will circumvent 80 per cent import tariff on games units which currently ..."
Hot on the heels of the latest Nintendo announcement, this brand new Officially Licensed SEGA Mega Drive range includes a 2 player home console (with original cartridge slot) and a handheld console (with SD card slot) – both PACKED with 80 (yes, eighty!) built-in games including the likes of: Sonic the Hedgehog 1, 2 and 3, Mortal Kombat 1, 2 and 3, Golden Axe 1, 2 and 3, Altered Beast, Alex Kidd, Columns and many, many more!
NINTENDO 64 CONSOLE COMES BOXED WITH ONE CONTROLLER 2 GAMES AND LEADS ...THE CONSOLE HAS SOME SCUFF MARKS ON THE UNDERNEATH SIDE OF IT..THERE ALSO SOME SMALL WEAR MARKS TO THE CONSOLE BUT ITS IN GOOD CLEAN WORKING CONDITION ..THE 2 GAMES ALSO HAVE SOME WEAR MARKS BUT ARE IN GOOD WORKING CONDITION ...I DONT HAVE THE SCART PLUG THAT FITS ONTO THE END OF THE RED WHITE AND YELLOW LEAD SOME TVS WORK WITHOUT THE PLUG AND OTHER TVS WOULD NEED IT ...THE 2 GAMES THAT COME WITH IT ARE V-RALLY EDITION 99 AND 007 GOLDENEYE...THE BOX THAT COMES WITH IT HAS WEAR AND TEAR ALL OVER THE BOX ..THERE ALSO SOME DENTS TO THE BOX ...IF YOU NEED ANY MORE INFORMATION OR PHOTOS PLEASE LET ME NO... WILL POST RECORDED TO INSURE OF SAFE DELIVERY
The European version was released in September 1990,[24] at a price of GB₤189.99.[25][26] The release was handled by Virgin Mastertronic, which was later purchased by Sega in 1991 and became Sega of Europe.[27] Games like Space Harrier II, Ghouls 'n Ghosts, Golden Axe,[26] Super Thunder Blade, and The Revenge of Shinobi were available in stores at launch. The console was also bundled with Altered Beast.[25] The Mega Drive and its first batch of games were shown at the 1990 European Computer Entertainment Show (ECES) in Earl's Court.[28] Between July and August 1990, Virgin initially placed their order for 20,000 Mega Drive units. However, the company increased the order by 10,000 units when advanced orders had exceeded expectations, and another 10,000 units was later added following the console's success at the ECES event. The projected number of units to be sold between September and December 1990 had eventually increased to 40,000 units in the United Kingdom alone.[29]
Some of the uniqueness of the new PS4 controller can also be attributed to its ability to grasp movement well, which is done in a way you have hardly seen before. It has a gyroscope, which is a thing that exists in reality, even though it sounds like something from a fantasy world. Apart from that, it has an accelerometer. These two things combined make the controller grasp movement quickly and easily, which has never been seen with such a console before. This controller is also the only one that officially supports Microsoft Windows, which is unique in itself. It gets power by charging the battery, which is settled in solid into the controller, and cannot be removed. So if you need a battery for something at home, you cannot count on taking out the battery from your PS4 controller.

In addition to accessories such as the Power Base Converter, the Sega Genesis supports two add-ons that each support their own game libraries. The first is the Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD in all regions except for North America), a compact disc-based peripheral that can play its library of games in CD-ROM format.[126] The second is the Sega 32X, a 32-bit peripheral which uses ROM cartridges and serves as a pass-through for Genesis games.[127] Sega produced a custom power strip to fit the peripherals' large AC adapters.[128] Both add-ons were officially discontinued in 1996.[57][126][127]
There are also consoles where you can install a LAN or Ethernet connection. You can play on the network with your friends by linking your consoles. You can install a LAN adapter on Wii, for example.  Wi-Fi technology is used to create a wireless network. Nowadays, one need not place all the consoles in the same room. You can organise battles with PSPs to play GTA, Street Fighter, even Final Fantasy.
But knowledge of this, along with adjusting the parental controls on your console, makes any game console infinitely more kid-friendly. Beyond that, it comes down to game selection: If a console doesn’t have a variety of kid-friendly games, it probably isn’t the best choice for the family room. A handful of games on the Xbox and PlayStation are great for kids, but again, neither console is really geared toward children.
The 32X was released in November 1994, in time for the holiday season. Demand among retailers was high, and Sega could not keep up orders for the system.[137] More than 1,000,000 orders had been placed for 32X units, but Sega had only managed to ship 600,000 units by January 1995.[127] Launching at about the same price as a Genesis console, the price of the 32X was less than half of what the Saturn's price would be at launch.[134] Despite the console's positioning as an inexpensive entry into 32-bit gaming, Sega had a difficult time convincing third-party developers to create games for the new system. After an early run on the peripheral, news soon spread to the public of the upcoming release of the Sega Saturn, which would not support the 32X's games. The Saturn was released on May 11, 1995,[139] four months earlier than its originally intended release date of September 2, 1995.[140] The Saturn, in turn, caused developers to further shy away from the console and created doubt about the library for the 32X, even with Sega's assurances that there would be a large number of games developed for the system. In early 1996, Sega conceded that it had promised too much out of the 32X and decided to stop producing the system in order to focus on the Saturn.[127] Prices for the 32X dropped to $99 and cleared out of stores at $19.95.[137]
Whether your gamer likes to slay dragons, race cars, or save the princess, video game consoles offer a little something for everyone. Search no further for an Xbox, Playstation or Nintendo so you can enjoy an immersive multimedia experience that puts you right in the middle of the action. Additional controllers allow friends to join in on the fun while a wireless headset lets you chat online without being tethered.

Sega released a combined, semi-portable Genesis/Sega CD unit called the Genesis CDX (marketed as the Multi-Mega in Europe). This unit retailed at $399.95 in the U.S.[142] (roughly $100 more than the individual Genesis and Sega CD units put together, since the Sega CD dropped its price to $229 half a year before[143]), and was bundled with Sonic CD, Sega Classics Arcade Collection, and the Sega CD version of Ecco the Dolphin.[144] The CDX features a small LCD screen that, when the unit is used to play audio CDs, displays the current track being played.[145] With this feature and the system's lightweight build (weighing two pounds), Sega marketed it in part as a portable CD player.[142]
These games speak for themselves: typical simulations or arcade games of different types of sports. The games we are looking at here offer a lot of entertainment and have an online function with a base of players from all over the world. This genre has never been bigger, and it is closely tied to the real world. The players you see in these games create an authenticity to the sports games that other genres are striving to provide. It can be, for example, football, hockey or racing. In any case, the players’ success depends on being able to get an overview of the game and act fast. The competition is the main element here, which also means these games add another type of online socializing. That is exactly what makes them so unique in comparison to other genres. FIFA is the standard-bearer here – you can find it, and many others, at Coolshop.

First announced in June 1988 in Beep!, a Japanese gaming magazine, the developing console was referred to as the "Mark V", but Sega management felt the need for a stronger name. After reviewing more than 300 proposals, the company settled on "Mega Drive". In North America, the name of the console was changed to "Genesis". The reason for this change is not known, but it may have been due to a trademark dispute.[19]
Sega began work on an enhancement chip to compete with the Super FX, resulting in the Sega Virtua Processor. This chip enables the Genesis to render polygons in real time and provides an "Axis Transformation" unit that handles scaling and rotation. Virtua Racing, the only game released with this chip, runs at a significantly higher and more stable frame rate than similar games on the SNES.[123] The chip was expensive to produce, and increased the cost of the games that used it. At US$100, Virtua Racing was the most expensive Genesis cartridge ever produced. Two other games, Virtua Fighter and Daytona USA, were planned for the SVP chip, but were instead moved into the Saturn's launch line-up.[123] There were plans to sell the SVP chip as a separate upgrade module for the Genesis,[124][125] but this module was never released.[123]
Nintendo understands that not all consoles are meant for the living room. The current-gen handheld consoles include the New Nintendo 2DS and 3DS XL, as well as the Nintendo Switch. Though the hardware of the DS XLs isn’t comparable to traditional consoles, they allow you to game wherever you are. You can play AAA titles on them, and some even allow for 3D gameplay. If you want something more powerful and versatile, which allows for handheld gameplay as well as traditional couch-and-TV-based gaming, for both solo and multiplayer fun, go with the Switch.
,Okay, I got this because I remember playing the Sonic the Hedgehog games when I was a kid. The feel of this in your hand is light, i.e. cheap, however, it has the games and they have worked for me. There are some people who said the sound was way off, but I haven't noticed any problems. Also, this will play Sega cartridges if you still have them/buy them and that's a nice plus.
All editorial content © 2003 - 2019 Armchair Arcade, Inc., an Armchair Creative Services, LLC, property. All rights reserved unless otherwise indicated. All trademarks and copyrights are retained by their respective owners. No content is to be removed or reused from the Armchair Arcade Website for commercial purposes without explicit permission from the principal Armchair Arcade staff, or the original trademark or copyright holders. Armchair Arcade, Inc., is not responsible for the content of any external sources or links. Further, endorsement of any external sources or links is neither implied nor suggested.
We all remember our first experience with a game console, whether it was in the local club, at a friend’s place or home in the living room. It was addictive – and we could not get enough. It can be difficult to choose, which game console to settle on – no matter if you are a hardcore fan of a certain console and go determinedly for the newest model, or if you are a beginner and have to make your first choice. To make it easier we will outline the different brands here:
The Sega Genesis Flashback is an attempt to capture a seemingly new, or at least reinvigorated, market while also not being too ambitious. At $80, the same price as the Super Nintendo Classic Edition, the Genesis Flashback struggles to approximate the user experience of Nintendo’s throwback. Instead, it tries to best it with back-of-the-box bullet points that, while impressive sounding, do little to cement its superiority.
While Sega was seeking a flagship series to compete with Nintendo's Mario series along with a character to serve as a company mascot, several character designs were submitted as part of a company-wide contest, including "an anime-inspired egg and a teal hedgehog with red shoes created by Naoto Ohshima that he called Mr. Needlemouse."[62] This character won the contest and was renamed Sonic the Hedgehog, spawning one of the best-selling video game franchises in history.[63][64] The gameplay of Sonic the Hedgehog originated with a tech demo created by Yuji Naka, who had developed an algorithm that allowed a sprite to move smoothly on a curve by determining its position with a dot matrix. Naka's original prototype was a platform game that involved a fast-moving character rolling in a ball through a long winding tube, and this concept was subsequently fleshed out with Ohshima's character design and levels conceived by designer Hirokazu Yasuhara.[65] Sonic's blue pigmentation was chosen to match Sega's cobalt blue logo, and his shoes were a concept evolved from a design inspired by Michael Jackson's boots with the addition of the color red, which was inspired by both Santa Claus and the contrast of those colors on Jackson's 1987 album Bad; his personality was based on Bill Clinton's "can do" attitude.[1][66][67][68]

PROS- (1) The price is right. You are paying less than a dollar a game. (2) The system is small and compact. Thus you can easily find a place for it. (3) It includes 2 controllers that seem to work well. (4) The connections are external. So unlike the Atari Flashback, it is very easy to just switch the game system in and out with your DVD player. (5) You get a great amount of games, and some really good ones too! 'Golden Axe,' 'Golden Axe 2,' 'Golde Axe 3,' 'Altered Beast,' 'Columns,' 'Sonic Hedgehog,' etc. (6) There is a cartridge port. So if you have Genesis cartridges leftover from the late 80s, you can play them again.
Most cities have small, local game stores where you can often find deeply discounted – albeit used – consoles and games. If that doesn’t bother you, it’s a wonderful way to save money. You can also save a ton by buying used accessories. By shopping at these local retailers, not only are you helping out a small business, but you’re also connecting with your local gaming scene – a value that’s too great to pass up. Most of the time, the people running these stores are avid gamers as well and can give you recommendations and keep you notified of upcoming releases, sales and in-store events.

In strategy games, the focus is not on a single character, but on a whole army. Just like role-playing games, they take their point of departure in the classic fiction genres like fantasy and science fiction, but there are also many strategy games based on historical events. Strategy games are about putting together the right units and using them strategically. Here the central activity consists of being economical with the resources, prioritizing certain units and leading them into battle. Many strategy games can be played online, but not in the same way as MMORPG. In online role-playing games the virtual world is permanent: the world continues to exist even when the player leaves. In online strategy games the world is temporary: it is created by a group of players within a single gameplay, and it ceases to exist when the last player has gone out.

The games combine skills and speed of teams that are trying to dominate over one another. Unreal Tournament, Quake, Half-Life, Counter-Strike – and today, also Call of Duty, Battlefield and Halo are all well-known and notorious names to the gamers – and to parents – for their violent approach. FPS games are leading in graphics and remain the coolest and the most dangerous in the gaming world.

Action-adventures is a mixed genre. The reason we include them separately, is that there are so many of these games, that they make up their own genre. Here action element (often in the form of a shooter) is combined with adventure element, where the player needs to solve different tasks. Action-adventure games take their point of departure in many types of fiction genres like gangster genre (Grand Theft Auto), modern action (Tomb Raider) and horror genre (Resident Evil).


Sega scaled down and adapted their Sega System 16 (used to power arcade hits like Altered Beast and Shinobi) into the Mega Drive (sold as the Genesis in North America) and released it with a near arcade-perfect port of Altered Beast. Sega's console met lukewarm sales in Japan, but skyrocketed to first place in PAL markets, and made major inroads in North America. Propelled by its effective "Genesis does what Nintendon't" marketing campaign, Sega capitalized on the Genesis's technological superiority over the NES, faithful ports of popular arcade games, and competitive pricing. The arcade gaming company SNK developed the high end Neo Geo MVS arcade system which used interchangeable cartridges similar to home consoles. Building on the success of the MVS, SNK repackaged the NeoGeo as the Neo Geo AES home console. Though technologically superior to the other fourth-generation consoles, the AES and its games were prohibitively expensive, which kept sales low and prevented it from expanding outside its niche market and into serious competition with Nintendo and Sega. The AES did, however, amass a dedicated cult following, allowing it to see new releases into the 2000s. Fourth generation graphics chips allowed these consoles to reproduce the art styles that were becoming popular in arcades and on home computers. These games often featured lavish background scenery, huge characters, broader color palettes, and increased emphasis on dithering and texture. Games written specifically for the NES, like Megaman, Shatterhand, and Super Mario Bros. 3 were able to work cleverly within its limitations. Ports of the increasingly detailed arcade and home computer games came up with various solutions. For example, when Capcom released Strider in the arcade they created an entirely separate Strider game for the NES that only incorporated themes and characters from the arcade.
×